Fried Duemilanove?

I was using my Arduino Duemilanove with about 15v input. I mistakenly allowed Vin to touch the 5v rail on the breadboard I was working with. I saw one of the LEDs on the Arduino shine extremely bright until I disconnected the line.

Now, when I go to program the Arduino I get an error. When power is first supplied, the PWR light comes on and the Rx and Tx lights blink briefly. When I’m trying to write to the board I can see the Rx LED blink a few times. However, the Tx light never comes on.

Here’s the error message I get from the IDE:
Binary sketch size: 1214 bytes (of a 30720 byte maximum)
hardware/tools/avr/bin/avrdude -Chardware/tools/avr/etc/avrdude.conf -v -v -v -v -pm328p -cstk500v1 -P/dev/tty.usbserial-A9007KRh -b57600 -D -Uflash:w:/Users/dcumberl/Desktop/arduino-0015/examples/Analog/Fading/applet/Fading.hex:i

avrdude: Version 5.4-arduino, compiled on Oct 9 2007 at 11:20:31
Copyright (c) 2000-2005 Brian Dean,

System wide configuration file is “hardware/tools/avr/etc/avrdude.conf”
User configuration file is “/Users/dcumberl/.avrduderc”
User configuration file does not exist or is not a regular file, skipping

Using Port : /dev/tty.usbserial-A9007KRh
Using Programmer : stk500v1
Overriding Baud Rate : 57600
avrdude: Send: 0 [30] [20]
avrdude: Send: 0 [30] [20]
avrdude: Send: 0 [30] [20]
avrdude: ser_recv(): programmer is not responding
avrdude: stk500_recv(): programmer is not responding
avrdude: Send: Q [51] [20]
avrdude: ser_recv(): programmer is not responding
avrdude: stk500_recv(): programmer is not responding

Did I fry the Atmega328? Did I fry the USB controller? None of the above? Is there any way for me to find out what is wrong before I order replacement parts?

When you attach the board, does the USB device show up? That could indicate the FTDI chip is "functioning."

You have likely blown the Atmel since its maximum operating voltage is 6.0V.

Your AVR chip is probably toast, but easy to replace. To check if the USB serial chip is OK just remove the AVR chip and then wire a jumper between pins 0 & 1. Now plug in the USB to the PC and launch either a serial terminal program or use the Serial Monitor function on the Arduino IDE. If typed characters from the PC keyboard 'echo' back then the USB serial convertor is functional.

Good luck and watch those 15vdc wires next time :wink:

Lefty

Thanks CMiYC and retrolefty. Great tips from both of you.

In my case, yes the device did show up when I connected the USB cable.
I then followed Lefty's advice, pulled the AVR and connected pins 0 and 1. After reconnecting the USB cable, I was able to confirm that the USB side still works.

Now I just have to wait for the replacement AVR in the mail. I learned the hard way on this one.