From dev board to chip burning

Hello,

It is 20year that i did not touch a microcontroler, and i discover arduino with many questions as I was programming in the old time the chip and then plug in a bread board or solder it on the final board :).

Sorry in advance if i put my topic in the wrong place :slight_smile: But i have very practical questions.

With the new chips with so many pins you should start with a dev board, and bootloader etc etc if you want to enjoy the arduino IDE. I am a bit lost in this new world as i was playing directly with asm...

Is there also a documentation that explain the concepts behind arduino (like bootloader, etc etc.) for old fashioned guy like me?

Is there a tutorial or some kind informations that could tell what is the way for a hobbyist like to burn a hex file on an empty chip that I could solder after (without the arduino bootloader, and only the needed library). (something like a DIP or TSSOP package easy to implement (solder) on a final circuit board)?

Thank you for your help.

Modern µC development system consist of two parts: the IDE for editing, compiling and managing projects and the controller itself. Details depend on the controller family.

8 bit AVR controllers can be programmed and updated in-circuit, with or without a bootloader, see the data sheets.
Larger controllers (SAM, ESP...) have a real-time system loaded, with its own communication channels (Ethernet, Bluetooth...) for adding user tasks. See Forum Documentation Playground for tutorials etc.

manurban:
Is there a tutorial or some kind informations that could tell what is the way for a hobbyist like to burn a hex file on an empty chip that I could solder after (without the arduino bootloader, and only the needed library). (something like a DIP or TSSOP package easy to implement (solder) on a final circuit board)?

Uploading hex file to a chip is certainly possible, but it seems to me that it is a great deal simpler just to do things the standard Arduino way (with the bootloader) unless there is specific technical reason not to do it that way.

I have built some projects on stripboard (veroboard) using DIP Atmega 328 chips. This Arduino-Breadboard tutorial is what I followed. In that Tutorial the bootloader is uploaded using ICSP and you can use the same technique to upload any program from the Arduino IDE if you don’t want to use the bootloader.

This Nick Gammon Tutorlal may also be of interest

…R

The real point of the Arduino project is that there are not just the original boards that Arduino.cc makes and sells, but now a huge supply of really cheap Chinese knock-offs. If you buy a module you have the bootloader already provided. This makes it simply not worthwhile to assemble a board yourself. It won't be cheaper, it won't be more reliable, it won't be smaller, it won't be faster and it will be more difficult.

If it amuses you to do so, then go ahead. It will give you satisfaction, but it will slow down any actual useful project. :astonished:

If you wanted a ready-made microcontroller module for a purpose, there was in the old days, the BASIC Stamp. But an Arduino module is now a fraction of the price and many times more capable and faster. If you need to put it on a custom PCB, then you just do so - it becomes a "daughterboard" mounted with its header pins.

But you certainly do not want a UNO. A Nano is ready to plug into the USB port of your PC and just program with the IDE, or a Pro Mini is the nearest thing to using the microprocessor "bare" (it does have a generally unnecessary 5 V regulator). If you wanted the absolute maximum speed and performance, you would use machine language, but it is most unlikely that you need that.