Genuino Input Voltage and documentation

Hello people, I have a question regarding the input of Genuino.

So far I have provided 5V from my laptop's USB which is 5V. Thus, I thought it could be the same if I provide 5V from a power bank that I charge my smartphone. The power bank is 5V/1A with a capacity of 4400mAh. Would it work this way?

Second, would it be safe to provide 9V battery at the input of Arduino and run the program normally?

I looked for documentation (explaining how the ports and interrupt work) but the only thing I found is the Eagle document, the microcontroller's port sketch and some examples at the "File" menu of Arduino. Isn't there a detailed document (pdf) explaining the interrupts etc?

Thank you in advance.

You could use your 5V supply, but you need to connect to the Arduino’s 5V rail, not the Vin or the DC power jack.

A 9V battery will work, connected to Vin or the DC jack, but will go flat reasonably quickly.

The Arduino reference in the IDE will help with a lot of things. It’s under “>Help >Reference”.
Regarding interrupts, the basics are covered in that reference.
there’s also more information here:- Interrupts

There’s a bit more info on the ports here:- Port Manipulation

You didn’t mention exactly which board you have, but you’ll find a wealth of extra information in the chip’s datasheet.
If it’s an UNO, Google “ATMega328P datasheet” and you’ll quickly find it. Same goes for the chip on other boards.

Thank you for your reply. I forgot to mention I use Genuino. Thank you for the information about Interrupts, I neglected that!

aredhell_vlsi:
Thank you for your reply. I forgot to mention I use Genuino. Thank you for the information about Interrupts, I neglected that!

"Genuino" is only the trade name, like "Arduino", not the board type. The board will be an "UNO", "Mega2560", "Pro Mini", "Due" etc.
The UNO, Pro Mini and some others use an ATMega328P chip, the Mega2560 uses an ATMega2560 chip, the Due uses an Atmel SAM3X8E ARM Cortex-M3 CPU, etc.
The ports, interrupts etc are different for different chips.

Ok thank you. Its Genuino Uno, ATMEL Mega328P. Well the thing is I m confused how to feed my devices with the required voltage. As you mentioned a battery will directly flat out. Thus, my question is :

  1. How about Arduino feed? Since I should only use the Vin pins or the jack, I thought of using a phone charger with this adapter :

http://www.ebay.com/itm/USB-to-5-5-mm-2-1-mm-5-Volt-DC-Barrel-Jack-Power-Cable-/261984156792?hash=item3cff78fc78:g:mNkAAOSwPcVVuFIm

What do you think?

  1. Now I have more other limitations. I want to use the motors of the starter kit which work at 6V operating voltage. I also have other components that work with 9V or 12 V. What do you suggest about this?

Thank you !

Maybe you should give a list of the components that you want to use.

The 6V motor will probably run on 5V without issues; look at the example code and connections how it is connected (quite sure it is not using a 6V source).

If you start mixing 9V and 12V devices, you are going to get an interesting power supply setup :smiley:

Since I should only use the Vin pins or the jack

Why? You can use a 5V charger directly and connect it to the USB port of the board. 5V on the Vin or barrel is potentially calling for problems.

Thank you sterretje. Well I suggested to not use 5V usb because it was suggested above. I also tried to feed with the charger of my phone, 5V/1A usb and it stopped after 5 sec. Maybe problem with the device? However I do charge well my phone now.

Right now I know that I need 12 V for a sensor I got, 6V for the motor, and maybe another 9V for another sensor. I am not sure what else I will need in the future. I am trying to solve each issue step by step and then move on.

Thus my question is, how do you feed 5V, 6V, 9V ,12V without battery or complex expensive units? thank you !

I don't think OldSteve suggested not to use USB (did not see it in his replies). If it stops working after 5 seconds, you probably did something wrong.

I would definitely try to find components that run on the same voltage. Also be aware that the Arduino can not take more than 5V (or 3.3V; in general not applicable to Uno) on its analog and digital inputs; so you might have to take measures for that for your 9V and 12V sensors.

The approach partially depends on e.g. distance between Arduino and sensors / motors. If they are all close, I would go for a solid 12V supply and use voltage regulators / buck converters (preferred) to derive the other voltages from the 12V. If they are far away from each other, it is might be better to have individual power supplies for the components.

You can power the Arduino from 12V (on Vin or barrel) if you do not draw too much current; safest not to use the 5V output of the Arduino in that case. That will save you one regulator / converter as you will be using the on-board one.

sterretje:
I don't think OldSteve suggested not to use USB (did not see it in his replies).

You're quite right. I did not say that he couldn't use the USB socket for his 5V input.
(I just forgot to mention it, and only mentioned the 5V pin.)
Thanks for pointing that out sterretje. :slight_smile:

sterretje:
I would definitely try to find components that run on the same voltage.

I agree wholeheartedly. At most, he should try to get everything to be powered by two voltage sources only, preferably 9V and 5V, or 12V and 5V if it's absolutely necessary.

And as you say, level-shifting between 9v/12V sensor outputs and the 5V Arduino inputs is an absolute [b[must[/b].