Get the Arduino to temperature!

Hi,

i know its a strange question, but is it possible to get the Arduino (Mega, Uno, Duo doesnt matter) hot through software? (so let it calculate something highly complicated for example)?

If so, what would be the arduino which gets the hottest :wink: and what software would that be?

Thank you so much for helping me with that strange question...

Cheers,

Pcace

The Arduino doesn't use any more power or cycles to calculate something hard than it does to sit and spin in a delay call. It will produce heat, but I don't think the amount of heat will have anything to do with what you have the code doing.

pcace:
Hi,

i know its a strange question, but is it possible to get the Arduino (Mega, Uno, Duo doesnt matter) hot through software? (so let it calculate something highly complicated for example)?

With Atmega328 (Arduino UNO) the power consumption only depends on clock rate.

clocking at 16 MHz uses roughly twice the current consumption than clocking with 8 MHz.

For lower power consumption you could use 8 MHz or 1 MHz internal clock rate.

For "hot" controller use over-clocking, perhaps up to 22 MHz (out of specification)

But power consumptions does not depend on the type of command being ececuted. Machine instruction 'NOP' (meaning No Operation) uses same power for this single instruction as any other controller instruction.

Ahh! Ok, thank you! That helps!

Cheers

jurs:
Machine instruction 'NOP' (meaning No Operation) uses same power for this single instruction as any other controller instruction.

That's unlikely to be quite true - CMOS power consumption depends on the number of gates switching(*),
and some instructions will switch more gates that others (muliply and divide instructions are probably
going to be more power hungry that NOPs, and memory accesses may be quite high (EEPROM write especially)

The major effect however is clock frequency since gates can only switch when clocked, and short of lots of
tedious experimentation there's probably no easy way to predict the dependence of supply current on
instruction type/mix.

(*) Each time a gate switches there is an energy dissipation of 1/2CV^2, where C is the capacitance involved in
the change of state. The energy dissipates in the various resistances in the chip as charge flows to charge and
discharge the internal capacitances.

Thus assuming N gates switch on every clock and the clock frequency is f, the power = N x f x C x V^2
(C is now the average capacitance per gate).

This why modern CPU have very small transistors so that C is small, and very low supply voltages so that
V is small - thus N and f can be larger without melting the silicon. Of course there are many other clever
tricks they pull to reduce power consumption, few of which are attempted on a lowly microcontroller.