Getting 220V from wall switch

Hi everyone!
I want to build a wifi home switch with esp8266.
Inside the wall normally there is 2 brown wires (L) that when we connect them together the lights turn on.
So my question is how to get 220 v from this 2 wires without closing the circuit(turning on the light) - I think that if i connect the two wires to the transformer(220 to 3.3v) it will work but I dont like to do experimentsw with high voltage.
maybe I need diodes?
Thanks!

I don't understand what a ESP8266 has to do with anything.

You need to convert 110 VAC to 220 VAC. That's circuitry.
They sell converters for that. https://www.amazon.com/Goldsource-STU-500-Voltage-Converter-Transformer/dp/B0022QOSDK

  1. If you are in Europe, long ago that the "220V" is now 230V (the three-phase has gone from 380V to 400V)

  2. What you want to do is not possible. It lacks either the neutral or the phase wire, probably the phase wire if the standards are respected.

If the standards are respected, the switch is between the neutral and the lamp.
The lamp is connected to the switch and to the phase.
So, if your installation is up to standard, you must add a phase wire.
Be careful with 230 V !

Inside the wall normally there is 2 brown wires (L) that when we connect them together the lights turn on.

In that case, 220V is only available (at relatively low current) when the switch is off.

Some companies make [u]2-wire home automation switch/dimmers[/u] so it's possible to do.

Often, you'll find hot, neutral, and ground, plus a switched wire. That makes it easier.

There are lots of engineering & construction challenges involved in making a remote-controllable switch that fits into a switch box and I always recommend buying rather than building. If you want to build something, build a controller, not the switch. (Most home automation switches don't work directly with Wi-Fi. Usually there is a controller/hub/router that converts Wi-Fi, or Ethernet, etc., to the particular home-automation protocol.)

You need to convert 110 VAC to 220 VAC. That's circuitry.

In some parts of the world, 220V is standard house power. :wink:

DVDdoug:
In that case, 220V is only available (at relatively low current) when the switch is off.

Some companies make [u]2-wire home automation switch/dimmers[/u] so it’s possible to do.

Often, you’ll find hot, neutral, and ground, plus a switched wire. That makes it easier.

There are lots of engineering & construction challenges involved in making a remote-controllable switch that fits into a switch box and I always recommend buying rather than building. If you want to build something, build a controller, not the switch. (Most home automation switches don’t work directly with Wi-Fi. Usually there is a controller/hub/router that converts Wi-Fi, or Ethernet, etc., to the particular home-automation protocol.)
In some parts of the world, 220V is standard house power. :wink:

Hi,
This is what i was talking about.
I know its possible( i have those switches installed in my home :slight_smile: ).
I know its not recomended to build it myself but i got to try something and i need to know the basic circuit to get those wires to give me 230 volt without closing the circuit.
Do you guys know how to do it?
Thanks again
Thanks!

schafon:
Hi,
This is what i was talking about.
I know its possible( i have those switches installed in my home :slight_smile: ).
I know its not recomended to build it myself but i got to try something and i need to know the basic circuit to get those wires to give me 230 volt without closing the circuit.
Do you guys know how to do it?
Thanks again
Thanks!

Without a Neutral you will not get 230V. What you have in your light switch box is the Live feed (from the supply) and the Switch wire (to the light). The Neutral most likely is fed direct to the light. Do NOT think you can use the earth as a return path either. The CPC is there for another reason - safety

Why do some people think it is OK to fuck around with house wiring when the reality is it WILL kill either you or someone else

MarkDerbyshire:
Why do some people think it is OK to fuck around with house wiring when the reality is it WILL kill either you or someone else

Think of it as selection of the fittest to continue. :smiling_imp:

What exact terminology do you use to explain to the insurance rep how the house burnt down??

Chil down!

im familiar with house wiring and this project would be assembled by my partner which is an electrician.
I just need your help in planning the circuit. I know its possible because i have working wall switches that connect this way.

Too dangerous to experiment inside a wall switch.
If you Google "Livolo", you see a range of remote controlled wall switches.
Make your own (safe, external) RF, WiFi, BT, etc. interface to control them.
Leo..

If you wire something across the switch it will be in series with the light when the switch is open and across a short circuit when switch is closed, (zero volts across a short).

edgemoron:
If you wire something across the switch it will be in series with the light when the switch is open and across a short circuit when switch is closed, (zero volts across a short).

In other words, you can never turn the light fully off, and the only way to get power to run the device when the light is on, is to drop some voltage to the light.

Not at all practical. The contact switches work because they don't consume any power.

schafon:
Hi everyone!
I want to build a wifi home switch with esp8266.
Inside the wall normally there is 2 brown wires (L) that when we connect them together the lights turn on.
So my question is how to get 220 v from this 2 wires without closing the circuit(turning on the light) - I think that if i connect the two wires to the transformer(220 to 3.3v) it will work but I dont like to do experimentsw with high voltage.
maybe I need diodes?
Thanks!

I’m thinking that … if you need to ask these sorts of questions, then best not tinker with mains power. Let your friend, or somebody qualified to handle it. The wrong move could get somebody killed, or a whole house burned down.

OK guys you're right..
Ill look for something ready and connect the wifi to it..
thanks anyway :slight_smile:

schafon:
OK guys you're right..
Ill look for something ready and connect the wifi to it..
thanks anyway :slight_smile:

Good idea.

And no disrespect to anyone in particular, but most 'electricians' I have met know virtually nothing about electrical safety at the electronic component design or assembly level.

68tjs:

  1. If you are in Europe, long ago that the “220V” is now 230V (the three-phase has gone from 380V to 400V)

Actually I think nothing has changed except the standards of voltage tolerance which cover a wider range
called “230”

MarkT:
Actually I think nothing has changed except the standards of voltage tolerance which cover a wider range
called "230"

Yes, Its a myth that the supply actually changed, it was just called something else.

We use 240V in the UK, 220V in most of the rest of Europe.

Its now called 230V so that there is a harmonised supply across Europe.