getting to ground

yes, I am new to arduino. I have a adafruit fx sound board. I power it on with a pin on my arduino at various times of the day. it has 11 trigger pins. to play a track you must GROUND that tracks pin momentarily.

what must I learn, to accomplish having my arduino ground a specific pin on the fx board.

thank you for your help

Please supply a link to information about the sound board.

pinMode(pin, OUPTUT);
digitalWrite(pin, LOW);

septillion:

pinMode(pin, OUTPUT);

digitalWrite(pin, LOW);

… if the pullup voltage on the sound board is <= 5V. Also, to remove the effect, you:

pinMode(pin, INPUT);

However, I am still suspicious and want to see the board specs.

aarg: However, I am still suspicious and want to see the board specs.

https://www.adafruit.com/product/2133

create an array of output pins attached to the device

byte pins[11] = {...

then just set the attached pins to OUTPUT and maintain the attached pins at HIGH

for (auto p : pins)
{
  pinMode(p, OUTPUT);
  digitalWrite(p, HIGH);
}

and then drop them low for a few milliseconds when you want to select a track

void playTrack(byte pin)
{
  digitalWrite(pin, LOW);
  delay(25); // you may have to mess with this
  digitalWrite(pin, HIGH);
}

thanks guys, I'm using, https://www.adafruit.com/product/2341

same thing basically. which leads to the question. if it gets set to HIGH isn't that going to push current through or to that pin?

just curious as I set the pins to high to light led's. low to turn them off. there may be more here to learn than previously expected. I will try this and see how it works.

thank again

High sets the pin to 5V and low sets the pin to ground potential, 0V. Whether or not that causes current to flow depends on what is connected to the pin and whether or not it is going to pass current at one of those voltages or the other.

Fredric58: if it gets set to HIGH isn't that going to push current through or to that pin?

just curious as I set the pins to high to light led's. low to turn them off. there may be more here to learn than previously expected. I will try this and see how it works.

thank again

well, you need some switching, all you need to do is drain a little current from the device, for whatever minimum time it takes for the signal to register. Check Adafruit and find out how much current their pins source. Check the docs to see how much your arduino can sink. Alternatively, you could use a transistor to drive the switching.

That module is meant to be controlled via serial, not those button inputs, which are meant for buttons and require 1/8 second hold-down. Read the tutorial...

That module is meant to be controlled via serial, not those button inputs, which are meant for buttons and require 1/8 second hold-down. Read the tutorial...

I did, and that's great if you want to sit there and type stuff in. I don't, looking for a work around. transistors were my original thought, an arduino pin high thru a resistor to the base would turn it on and send the pin to ground. but that's 11 transistors.

or 1 transistor with a manual rotary switch so which ever pin was chosen on the switch would play that track when the transistor turns on. but that limits me to one track at a time.

and again.....another component.

the design of the fx in that it has a special file play naming convention is pretty cool. what would be even cooler is having the arduino replace me sitting there typing in the serial port telling it what to do.

there's bound to be a way, I simply haven't found it yet.

Fredric58: I did, and that's great if you want to sit there and type stuff in.

Um, that can be done by the Arduino through the serial port. That's the whole point of it.

aarg, we've spoke before. hope all is well with you. been a couple years. steely dan fan too. ok, so what your saying is I can control the adafruit fx sound board through the serial port and NOT have to be there?

that would be freakin' awesome. the adafruit has a tutorial and a library sketch, but you have to be there to tell it what to do. press this.......do this......

raise vol lower vol play track x loop track, yada yada.

I already know what I want it to do. serial would be way cool. can you point me to an example tutorial or a lesson you think would expand my understanding but NOT BE way over a beginners head?

or provide an example that I can take apart, modify till I come up with a solution?

Thanks

Have you installed the library? Once you do you can open the "menucommands" example and see how the board is controlled. Menu selections are entered manually but look for the lines that begin with "sfx.", they send commands over Software Serial.

My advice is save a copy of the example then throw out everything after setup(), with an empty loop(). At the end of setup() add a line to play track #1.

sfx.playTrack(1);

When you get that working look through the example for all the other commands. I don't know how you will trigger them in your project but that should get you started.

thank you, yes I have installed the library. I will go over it again. yes, it's the triggering part that's a buggar.