Go from Arduino Mega Adk to production

Hi,

I've been using the Arduino Mega ADK as our development board and now I need to investigate take the project from here to production. We need the chip to work similarly to what's on Arduino Mega ADK, supporting USB OTG.

The chip on Arduino Mega ADK is ATmega8U2, would I just need to buy one and get my sketch onto the chip?

Please help! Thanks.

Chuender

There are actually 3 controllers on the MegaADK:
Two Atmel chips and one MAX

The Arduino ADK is a microcontroller board based on the ATmega2560 (datasheet). It has a USB host interface to connect with Android based phones, based on the MAX3421e IC. It has 54 digital input/output pins (of which 15 can be used as PWM outputs), 16 analog inputs, 4 UARTs (hardware serial ports), a 16 MHz crystal oscillator, a USB connection, a power jack, an ICSP header, and a reset button.
Similar to the Mega 2560 and Uno, it features an ATmega8U2 programmed as a USB-to-serial converter.
Revision 2 of the MegaADK board has a resistor pulling the 8U2 HWB line to ground, making it easier to put into DFU mode.

Hi @mrburnette,

Thanks for the reply. I've read that same passage prior to posting and I'm not sure what to make of it.

Perhaps this is pure ignorance on my apart, but I kind of assumed that there would be a rather standard process of going from developing on Ardurino Mega ADK to a production board. In addition to knowing that chips are involved, we also need to know the software that ships with Arduino. For instance "it features an ATmega8U2 programmed as a USB-to-serial converter", is this a pretty standard software that is widely available, or do we need something specific since we need to support USB OTG?

We're just using the board to take in a couple of serial readings and outputting that via USB to Android, with Android acting as host.

Thanks!

Chuender

For instance "it features an ATmega8U2 programmed as a USB-to-serial converter", is this a pretty standard software that is widely available, or do we need something specific since we need to support USB OTG?

The MAX3421e chip is managing the USB to Android.
The ATmega8U2 is the PC USB virtual comm port.
The ATmega2560 is the Megaboard main uC.

The firmware for both the ATmega processors is open source and downloadable.
There "may" be another way to talk to Android other than the MAX3421e BUT then you have fully changed the design.

Via this link, Mouser states they have the ADK for $46 vs regular $68...
http://www.mouser.com/ProductDetail/Arduino/A000067/?qs=gMoqXxk%2F%2F5apEOlL63oO8Q%3D%3D&gclid=CMDagtHBuLsCFYVZ7AodnzsAFw

Options:
Stay with the MegaADK and use least expensive supplier if your expected number of production units is small. OR...
Take the open source hardware and software to a Fab and have your "own" boards made - just remove all references to the "Arduino" copyright and logo. OR...
Redesign. Maybe Bluetooth?

It really comes down to what you expect to achieve in the marketplace. IF Mouser is really selling the "real" board for $45, that is a good price BUT you may look into Chinese clones too. Remember, clones are legal but must not use the Arduino logo or imply real-Arduino made in Italy unless properly licensed by Arduino.

Ray

EDIT:
A search of eBay this morning indicates that just under $30 U.S. seems to be the clone price (inc. shipping) for quantity 1 of Arduino-compatible Cappuccino Mega 2560 ADK Newark shows the Atmega2560 being $17.98 in quantity 1 and $11.79 in qty 25-99 - just to put things into perspective.
It has been my experience that many Chinese eBay merchants will consider "a reasonable offer" for quantity merchandise, so it is possible that a discount could be obtained.
Again, the downside to this is that the Mega2560ADK board is large and being non-custom, you have no control over the formfactor.
The Google page: Android Peripherals and Accessories  |  Android Open Source Project makes an interesting statement:

Accessories use the Android Open Accessory (AOA) protocol to communicate with Android devices, over a USB cable or through a Bluetooth connection.

We're just using the board to take in a couple of serial readings and outputting that via USB to Android, with Android acting as host.

Not knowing anything other than what you stated above, I would think that a smaller Arduino with a generic Bluetooth accessory would be satisfactory. The downside being you have already completed your project using the 2560/ADK.

You may wish to consider something like:
http://www.pjrc.com/teensy/index.html
Users rave about this product, it is well supported, and economical.