Good example sketches for basic parts??

I just got my Uno/r3 and because of severely tight budget, I only have 1k & 270 ohm resistors and LEDs, a breadboard and a but load of jumper wires. Can anyone make suggestions on which example sketches I can play around with using only those parts to get more acquainted with plotting circuitry and learning code?

Also, it might be a good idea to list other good example sketches based on other groupings of parts for other newbies looking to branch out.

TYIA

Hi....

You have the perfect opportunity to embrace the Blink Without Delay philosophy. Get a load of LEDs blinking independently of each other. You can use wires as switches, so you can mimic turning things off and on by making / breaking circuits.

Getting stuck in using delay() catches everyone eventually when they (we?) can't break out of that approach. So embrace blink without delay now, and you're set for ever.

Next thing to get is a 10k potentiometer then you can do an analog read, and use that input to inform your output. When budget allows, get a couple of transistors and diodes and toy motor.

Have you looked at the example sketches that come with the IDE?

You can probably try many of the examples that come with the Arduino IDE by pretending that an LED is some other component. Almost every external device is controlled by an Arduino making the I/O pins got HIGH or LOW.

Buying a 10,000 ohm potentiometer (which is not expensive) will allow you to experiment with a lot more stuff. Your jumper wires ca be used as switches just by touching them together.

The other thing you can experiment with "for free" is communication between the Arduino and your PC.

This demo several things at a time illustrates how to blink a few LEDs. You don't need all the parts for the demo to work. This demo shows how to communicate with an Arduino using Python. This Thread takes you through Planning and Implementing a Program.

...R

@Robin and Jimbo, thank you very much, I will definitely get to reading and playing with those sketches.

@ Larry, thank you as well. I did look through the example sketches as best I can, but unfortunately they do not have an included "parts needed" list and I though it pointless to fire up a sketch w/ the needed hardware.

If you access the example through the site here, each has a circuit diagram. LEDS, switches, resistors, a pot or two, a servo.... that's about it. I thnk one needs a piezo buzzer.

I guess what I was hoping to find was a page that had check boxes next to the hardware I have on hand to help me filter down the example sketches that I could perform/play around with based upon my current hardware. Not finding such a page inspired this thread.

myggle: I guess what I was hoping to find was a page that had check boxes next to the hardware I have on hand to help me filter down the example sketches that I could perform/play around with based upon my current hardware.

Now there is an opportunity for you.

...R

[/quote]

Now there is an opportunity for you.

...R [/quote]

I'm already on it, just give me a little bit to collect the hardware and learn how to use it with the examples, but I can definitely do something like that in PDF. You think the site mods would create a page based on that?

By the way, build yourself a simple LED logic probe out of an old BIC pen.
You need one or two LEDs and a 270 resistor.
You can check the logic state of an Arduino pin simply by touching it with your probe.
See:
http://www.seattlerobotics.org/encoder/200012/logicprobe.htm

probe.jpg

I recently acquired an old desktop tower that I proceeded to desolder to get some new components to learn with. I tried with my weller gun and had limited success, but I then used a heat gun and they all started to drop off the PCBs on their own with minimal added effort to remove. I expect the careless nature of my unskilled hands may have ruined some of the parts I salvaged, but I also expect many might still be usable. I notice that the legs off of each component are very short. Is it possible to solder new legs on so that I can use these parts in breadboard and Arduino projects, and if yes, what would be good to function as legs?

I then used a heat gun and they all started to drop off the PCBs

That’s a reasonable way to do it.
Protect your eyes, wear gloves.
Tapping the heated PCB upside down on the work bench helps to get them to fall out/off.

Is it possible to solder new legs

You could, but but it may be too expensive.
See:
http://www.king-cart.com/phoenixent/product=HEADERS-MACHINED-PIN+BREAKAWAY+.1SP/exact_match=exact

if you need free parts. look to old radios, CD players, printers, etc.

I de-mounted a lot of stuff with a blow torch.

outside pizza box covered with aluminum. brick to use as an anvil.

heat the board and with the lead side DOWN, wack the board on the brick. the molten lead comes flying off onto the aluminum and the now free chips go flying. the fun parts, pots and some LEDs and such will accumulate pretty quickly.

probably 90% of what we do is simple on/off, be it a relay or light.

there is no reason you cannot make up a control and pretend the LED is the final device. after all, if it goes ON when you want and OFF when you want, your software is correct. it is a simple matter to replace the LED with a transistor.

dave-in-nj: probably 90% of what we do is simple on/off, be it a relay or light.

And another 8% can be tested with PWM on an LED.... if it dims and brightens as expected, the s/w is good.

Thanks guys! I did some more book worming and came across a vid that suggested to use "network wiring" as legs so I assume that ethernet wire might suffice, just gotta get a better soldering iron as this Weller gun is too big for micro electronics. I am yet to plug my arduino in again and get to creating something. As far as pretend? I'm a bit lost on that as I can put the LED into 13/220ohm/GND and pretend it's a space shuttle en route through the black hole with plan to return. Sorry, I am much less imaginative and have to build it, then see it in action kind of guy. If there are bugs, then that's where the learning comes in. But now I just have to track down some phone line or ethernet wire to make legs and start testing these free components, then it's Uno time!

Many of my projects are demos and require little supporting parts: http://www.hackster.io/rayburne/

And don't forget that family may habpve old electronic devices that can provide resistors, transistors, and caps. Example: old portable TV, transistor radios, etc.

Ray