Got the know-how w/ a 4080* standard clock display?

Greetings, Salvaged this clock display from an alarm clock the other day. Seems like it would be a sweet display. However, I haven't been able to find any data on it. Probability, seems rather low, but I figured I'd ask.

32 pin Front of PCB : SB-4080-1 Back: F2-4080CHG1-12 // 21 March 2004

Images (large) : http://imgur.com/VN6pN7R,rxwjbw4

Greetz,

if there isnt additional chip visible i would try (in case there are so many lines connected) to find out how it is wired.
I would simply take a 3.3 V power source and start from 1-GND, 2-Power, then 3 Power etc. trying out :wink:

Looks like normal 5 pieces of 7 Segment Displays -the middle could show only : or /
Or a (so named) 4 and a half Display

Or could you get the electronic from it from the clock ?
Maybe there is a multiplexer connected, which you can use

A.R.Ty: Greetz,

if there isnt additional chip visible i would try (in case there are so many lines connected) to find out how it is wired. I would simply take a 3.3 V power source and start from 1-GND, 2-Power, then 3 Power etc. trying out ;)

Looks like normal 5 pieces of 7 Segment Displays -the middle could show only : or / Or a (so named) 4 and a half Display

Or could you get the electronic from it from the clock ? Maybe there is a multiplexer connected, which you can use

The display was connected to a single, main board. I looked at it, but honestly, I wouldn't know how to read the pin routes.

My plan B was to just test the pins as well. But I'm the type of tinkerer that tends to set fire to things XD.

But I'm the type of tinkerer that tends to set fire to things

Murphys law - give it a try ]:D ;)

A.R.Ty:

But I'm the type of tinkerer that tends to set fire to things

Murphys law - give it a try ]:D ;)

I got it to light up about 50%.

There must be at least 3 GNDs, which I'm not seeing in reference to other displays pin outs. Kinda strange.

That kind of display is meant to run in a two-phase manner, not that simple.

Have a look here: http://www.eleccircuit.com/cheap-digital-time-clock-with-alarm-circuit-by-lm8560/

// Per.

There must be at least 3 GNDs, which I'm not seeing in reference to other displays pin outs. Kinda strange.

Yo, i think that are 3 Displays: the 1st 2, the seperator and the last 2. So 3 times Ground seems OK.

I got it to light up about 50%

Do you mean 50% brightness ? Some clocks have a "NightMode",means the brightness is lower than normal.

A.R.Ty:

There must be at least 3 GNDs, which I'm not seeing in reference to other displays pin outs. Kinda strange.

Yo, i think that are 3 Displays: the 1st 2, the seperator and the last 2. So 3 times Ground seems OK.

I got it to light up about 50%

Do you mean 50% brightness ? Some clocks have a "NightMode",means the brightness is lower than normal.

I meant 50% of the segments lit up. (Discovered) 8888 ^ can't get the first one now. So I'm 75% XD

I meant 50% of the segments lit up. (Discovered) 8888 ^ can't get the first one now. So I'm 75% smiley-lol

Top - maybe the segments have not a common cathode or anode...

Zapro: That kind of display is meant to run in a two-phase manner, not that simple.

Have a look here: http://www.eleccircuit.com/cheap-digital-time-clock-with-alarm-circuit-by-lm8560/

// Per.

Is this that part when I realize that undocumented salvaged parts belong in the garbage? XD

Is this that part when I realize that undocumented salvaged parts belong in the garbage? smiley-lol

That's what people normally do...if they haven't an ARDUINO XD

What Zapro is suggesting is that many - most? - such clock displays are a matrix of two by twelve or so (given that not all segments of the first digit exist as it only ever shows "1" or "2"). They frequently use the power transformer as the multiplexing source; the two commons are each connected to one side of the transformer secondary which feeds a bridge rectifier to power the logic. The signal from one side of the power transformer which allows the logic to count cycles to track the time, also switches the logic to multiplex the alternate segments.

And the timer chip may be PMOS so that it uses a positive "ground" so that the cathodes will be the commons in the display.

For example.

Paul__B: What Zapro is suggesting is that many - most? - such clock displays are a matrix of two by twelve or so (given that not all segments of the first digit exist as it only ever shows "1" or "2"). They frequently use the power transformer as the multiplexing source; the two commons are each connected to one side of the transformer secondary which feeds a bridge rectifier to power the logic. The signal from one side of the power transformer which allows the logic to count cycles to track the time, also switches the logic to multiplex the alternate segments.

And the timer chip may be PMOS so that it uses a positive "ground" so that the cathodes will be the commons in the display.

For example.

All I wanted to do is have is light up :( I had no idea it would be that complex.

Thank you for that information! :D

dritchie: All I wanted to do is have is light up :( I had no idea it would be that complex.

It's not really complex, it is multiplexed as are most 7-segment displays, but with a simple two-phase multiplex rather than anything more.