GPS+Compas+accelerometer to track Polaris star

zoomkat:

You don’t have to do everything on an Arduino, you know!

Just curious about the non relevant hanger flying. :slight_smile:

I don’t know what that means, but if you’re saying that wasn’t what the question was about - well, you aren’t wrong.

This project was initially intended to take spherical panoramic photos. But i also like to take long exposure shots of the night sky (star trails) but it takes some time to find the North Pole Star so i was thinking that i will put my tripod on the ground and let the finding of the Polaris to the device - this is the stationary mode. Then i got the idea to track the ISS... For this kind of calculation i will wait for the Due to come out. I do use a display, a TouchShield Slide (see second part of this video http://www.grozeaion.com/electronics/high-speed-photography/150-dslr-ring-flash.html)

Now i'm also thinking to buy a Android tablet and see if i can use together with Google Night Sky to control the head

This project was initially intended to take spherical panoramic photos.

That sounds like a very doable idea, but you have lost me on the celestial stuff. If you don't know where the Pole Star or True North are and the Arduino does not know where True North is how is the Arduino supposed to find the Pole Star?

radman:

This project was initially intended to take spherical panoramic photos.

That sounds like a very doable idea, but you have lost me on the celestial stuff. If you don't know where the Pole Star or True North are and the Arduino does not know where True North is how is the Arduino supposed to find the Pole Star?

Given GPS and a compass+inclinometer the Arduino could get a pretty accurate idea of where it needs to point to have any given celestial object in its field of view - as long as you can do the calculations. They are likely to involve significant amounts of arithmetic and you'd probably want to do that remotely and then just tell your Arduino which way to point.

Sorry PeterH I still don't see how the Arduino can find the Pole Star with just a compass and an inclinometer and no information on magnetic declination.

I am in the USA I put my tripod with arduino down, the GPS gives me latitude and longitude, the compass tells me where Magnetic North is, but that could still leave me perhaps 30deg from True North unless something tells me the magnetic declination of where I am. Is that not right?