gps module?

Hey guys, whats the best gps module for the arduino? if u guys plan on asking what im gonna use it for, its in essence an automotive project, but can u also lemme knw what factors play into choosing the right gps for the right project (e.g. what values should i be looking at and what they mean)

Cheers,
AV

I dont know which one is the best but this looks ok http://www.libelium.com/squidbee/index.php?title=GPS_module

Would be cool to have it working with google local.

So i could track bots on my mobile from anywhere.

they have nice autopilot systems tho... now thats pro... wanna use that in my car at one point... i dunno how the feds might react tho

I've had pretty good luck with a couple of EM-406As.

Mikal

It seems that Sparkfun is out of these. I have had good experiences with these (2nd item on the page): http://www.ohararp.com/products.html

Adafruit carries the EM-406As as well.

around the same topic

if i wanted to control a motor using an arduino, would i use a brushed motor like this

http://www3.towerhobbies.com/cgi-bin/wti0001p?&I=LXJZM8&P=0

or would i connect the arduino to a brushless motor like this

http://www3.towerhobbies.com/cgi-bin/wti0001p?&I=LXUFB7&P=0

if i wanted to control a motor using an arduino, would i use a brushed motor like ...

A hobby Electronic Speed Controller (brushed or brushless) can be controlled by the arduino using one of the servo libraries. But its not possible to advise on a motor without more information about your application.

For example: how much power do you need and how fast does the motor need to turn? Is price or power efficiency more important?

well power efficiency, but if ure speaking about buying nice motors then i'll tell u i have a nice brushless system lying around to use...

but ure saying that i can control the speed control (pwm connection?) through the arduino? do u have any direct documentation on how to do this?

i stripped an old Roadstar RN-202 from its USB cable.. works like a charm and costs on ebay less than 20$ (last time i checked)

but ure saying that i can control the speed control (pwm connection?) through the arduino? do u have any direct documentation on how to do this?

There have been a number of discussions on this topic, for example: http://www.arduino.cc/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl?num=1226292633

but just to be clear, these hobby speed controllers do not use the Arduino PWM output, they are driven just like a servo. See the thread linked above for more info

read it, thx, but from wat i got the control of the motor this way is fairly tough... or atleast is not as sensitive as one might hope... or is this just my misunderstanding?

but from wat i got the control of the motor this way is fairly tough... or atleast is not as sensitive as one might hope...

That depends on what are you hoping for? :wink:

It's not uncommon for RC speed controller to have 200 steps or more of resolution. For example these inexpensive controllers have 1024 steps: http://www.micronradiocontrol.co.uk/ba_esc.html

What are your requirements?

so ure saying it all depends on the hardware, not the software? thats good, cause i was worried that even if i got a good, high-step esc, i would get screwed over by the programming side

It depends on both, but I am not sure you need worry about either. Do you have a specific set of requirements in mind?

im still relatively new, so i cant give u numbers, but the setup will be the ability to control the speed of a 540 motor (like this one: http://www3.towerhobbies.com/cgi-bin/wti0001p?&I=LXUFB7&P=7) in response to a input data from several sensors

http://cgi.ebay.com/Arduino-GPS-Netduino-GPS-receiver-w-tutorial-Sparkfun-/250686123796?pt=GPS_Devices&hash=item3a5e0eaf14#ht_499wt_1048

I got this gps unit and it currently is used in my data logger. It works great and best of all it was cheap.

Regarding the GPS module question:

I have the EM-406a, and a U-blox. The EM-406a has a very tiny 6-pin connector,which must be plugged into a mating receptacle. SparkFun sells a shield-board with the unique connector on it. Plug the shield into the Arduino, and it works.

The U-blox module plugs into an X-bee adapter. The input/output connector on the X-bee adapter is the standard .1 pin spacing for either a male or female connector. I got the X-bee adapter from Adafruit, and left off the bottom side breadboard pins, which makes a pretty small package, and easy to connect 5v, Gnd. and Tx, using a 6-pin, rt. angle connector.

I used Mikal Hart's excellent TinyGPS library in my project sketch.

Also, the U-blox website (Swiss) has several programs for configuring and reading the module. By plugging a FTDI-USB cable into the module, and using the programs from U-blox, you can configure the module. The U-blox module has a connector for the antenna, which can be obtained from SFun. I tried the U-blox without the antenna connected, and it will not receive a signal. The EM-406a module has an antenna built in, and works pretty good indoors I got my U-blox module from SeeedStudio, and it costs the same as the EM-406a.

Additionally, the U-blox web site has a several technical PDF files about GPS, including the history of GPS. Quite and interesting read all in itself.

Regards,
John

Posted by: i182willsw Posted on: 23.09.2010 at 05:56:17
http://cgi.ebay.com/Arduino-GPS-Netduino-GPS-receiver-w-tutorial-Sparkfun-/25068...

I got this gps unit and it currently is used in my data logger. It works great and best of all it was cheap.

DO NOT buy one. I did. I received a damaged Pharos GPS-500 with a Microsoft label on it. They were packaged with Microsoft Streets a few years ago. The 6 pin header had one pin cut off so that it more closely resembled the 5 pin model shown in the SparkFun tutorial, but it is a completely different unit. It did not work wired as shown in the tutorial. I looked up the Pharos pin out and it was different, but it did not work wired that way either.

The seller was i182willsw (what a shock). >:( >:( >:(