GsmWebServer?

Has anyone been able to succeed in getting a GSM webserver? I would think that since there is example code, that someone has tested this and done this. I cannot find any documentation on it so that I can find out what they used, how they did it, what problems they ran into, or anything to help me be successful in creating a gsm webserver.

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No need to constantly bump, it's totally okay if your posts bleeds into the second or even third page. Also there's no need to have multiple threads of the same subject, that's spamming this board.

I have done some web server work for the Arduino already (the public server can actually be seen here: http://ihys.dyndns-server.com/) So it is, in fact, possible to host a web server on the Arduino that is public (web facing), however with the GSM, I'm not entirely too sure. I do work with wireless communication professionally though. What are some of the issues you are running into, I could TRY to be of some help.

Yes, I was able to host a webpage and control the arduino through that webpage, accessible by any computer. That was with an ethernet shield connected to my cable isp. With gsm this seems a bit more difficult. For one, I rarely get the gsmwebserver example to work. It seems like it only works on perfectly clear days. I can use the client example and connect quickly and it works every time but the web server doesn't work. When I use the sim in a cell phone and access whatismyipaddress.com I get this info:

216.68.79.204 ISP: Fuse internet access Organization: GPRS Public Network

Now that seems to me like a publicly accessible ip address. Now, if I can just get the webserver example to work I will see if it generates that same IP address. I'm pretty sure it doesn't because I did it before and got something like 10.#.#.# and could not ping it. I think there is something wrong with the example code. I'm not sure what to do about it.

Now that seems to me like a publicly accessible ip address. Now, if I can just get the webserver example to work I will see if it generates that same IP address. I’m pretty sure it doesn’t because I did it before and got something like 10.#.#.# and could not ping it. I think there is something wrong with the example code. I’m not sure what to do about it.

The GSM network probably follows the same type setup as a home router. The home router has an outside WAN (routable internet) IP address, and a LAN network behind it with non internet routable IP addresses (10.#.#.# ). The problem is you do not have control over the GSM providers firewall/routers to enable outside request to reach your internal 10.#.#.# IP address. You need to talk to your GSM provider to see if they can help you out.

216.68.79.204 ISP: Fuse internet access Organization: GPRS Public Network

Now that seems to me like a publicly accessible ip address

If somebody else using the same network provider goes to whatismyipaddress.com I bet they see the same address.

If you think about it the they cannot be providing unique public IP addresses to every SIM.

Do a whois on the IP address.

Yeah, you guys are exactly right. I already contacted the two providers I was working with. One said there is nothing they can do and I have not heard back from the other one yet. Might have to try out some other service providers.

Might have to try out some other service providers.

Having a GsmWebServer seems like an unusual requirment to me so I am not sure you will have much luck.

Why can you not host the site in the normal way via an ISP and then view it (and possibly maintain/update it) via gsm?

The arduino will be completely mobile. It will not be around any wifi connections so the only way I could keep it connected is through some sort of mobile network like sprint, verizon, at&t, etc. At least, that is what I have gathered so far.

durkinnj: The arduino will be completely mobile. It will not be around any wifi connections so the only way I could keep it connected is through some sort of mobile network like sprint, verizon, at&t, etc. At least, that is what I have gathered so far.

So have the arduino send all its data to a real server and use that as the web server.

But, I need it to sit and wait for a request so that it doesn't use up bandwidth polling the server every second. So could it somehow wait for the server to send it commands without using much if any bandwidth?

I think you need to give more detail on your application e.g. what is the webserver for, why does the Arduino need to be completely mobile and so on.

The arduino is in a motor vehicle. This motor vehicle can be anywhere and needs to be connected always so that any device, anywhere, can connect and choose to shut the vehicle off, get it's location, or things like that. Hope that helps.

Rather than using a web server, how about using SMS as your transport mechanism? That would support asynchronous bidirectional communication, has a little bit of resilience built in, and would be simple to develop and test. Presumably you'd want to build in some security.

The reason why I didn't want to do sms is because it takes a while to send and receive the messages. If it was instant, like 1 second, I would definitely do it.

The arduino is in a motor vehicle. This motor vehicle can be anywhere and needs to be connected always so that any device, anywhere, can connect and choose to shut the vehicle off, get it’s location, or things like that. Hope that helps.

Is GSM service available everywhere in the world (or even in the US) where a car might be? I think not.

Correct! But it is as close as I can get to being always connected, is it not?

durkinnj: The reason why I didn't want to do sms is because it takes a while to send and receive the messages. If it was instant, like 1 second, I would definitely do it.

I'm not sure why you view that as a problem, but perhaps you would consider this as a 'Mark 1' that will be easy to get going while you figure out how to implement a reliable bidirectional global communication mechanism over HTTP.