Hall Sensor, Magnet Dust?

General question, will a hall sensor detect magnet dust if there is enough present? Idea is for an escape game puzzle that I'm making.

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Well I bought these guys at Lowe's just to test it out.

I would have to grind them down to dust, wasn't sure how much would be needed to make a hall sensor detect the dust. These magnets are pretty strong actually and about 1.5" away the hall sensor detects the magnet.

The hall sensor is a model # 44E402.

magnetic dust? That will cling together since it is magnetic, you will have a "malleable" magnet. Why the dust and not just a magnet?

Grinding it up will reduce its magnetic power for sure. Lime suggest d6arker, give it a try

It's for an escape room puzzle with test tubes and I have a gel inside with bubbles and glowing fluid mixed in. A magnet just sitting on the bottom ruins the effect. So my thought was what if I grind enough of a magnet to trip the hall sensor and it'll look a little better than just a round magnet sitting at the bottom of the test tube.

Sounds fun,
if plan is to have them actually pour the contents onto something I would use a modified ph sensor.

You can set one vial solution slight acidic and other slightly base so they have to mix them to a more neutral solution to unlock.

Other wise you could build a color sensor to verify via color change the test tubes were mixed correctly, no pouring required.

Sounds like a fun project indeed. However if your grind your magnet, the dust will cling together again like one single magnet.

The gel might keep it separated indeed. Not sure how your magnetic field will look like then and how strong it will be. As soon the viscosity of your gel is at a point you can pour it, i guess your dusvwill become one again. Not sure if there is any pouring involved, just thinking about it because of the previous answer

Bringamosa:
Sounds like a fun project indeed. However if your grind your magnet, the dust will cling together again like one single magnet.

The gel might keep it separated indeed. Not sure how your magnetic field will look like then and how strong it will be. As soon the viscosity of your gel is at a point you can pour it, i guess your dusvwill become one again. Not sure if there is any pouring involved, just thinking about it because of the previous answer

The "dust" particles will still be magnetic and will clump N-S in a random manner. Probable result is no net magnet pole. So try it, but expect failure.

Paul

What may work better is to replace the magnet dust with iron dust, and use an inductive sensor. You should be able to detect the presence of the iron that way, and distinguish it from other liquids/non-magnetic materials.