Happy PI-day

I placed my free PI-poster at http://www.wiblocks.com

Thanks to D.K., TeX and Friends.

(* jcl *)

?

Over a day to go...

But also ?++

Over a day to go to what?

PI day... Keep up :D

AWOL: ?

Pi day is on the 14th of march (3.14 - the date being the first three digits of pi). Pi day has its own website: http://www.piday.org/ which should have more details.

Onions.

3.14 - the date being the first three digits of pi

...in decimal. God! How lame is that? (Besides, it's 14/3, not the 22nd of July)

XD XD XD

I just found out something even funnier than pi-day on wikipedia:

Pi Approximation Day is held on July 22 (or 22/7 in day/month date format), since the fraction 22?7 is a common approximation of ?

Who comes up with these things!? Onions.

22 / 7 is for primary school kids. 355 / 113 is a much better approximation.

or just remember 3.141592654

How many nerds don't know that? Come on!?

or just remember 3.141592654

As was mentioned 22/7 is useful for primary school kids.

Can also be useful for doing quick approximations in your head.

(* jcl *)

But it's still better than remembering 355/113 ;)

or just remember 3.141592654

How many nerds don't know that?

Uber nerds just remember 4atan(1)

Well I get 3.141592654 as one more degree of accuracy still :smiley:

Anyway happy american PI-day :smiley:

Don McLean anyone? :stuck_out_tongue:

I read once that pi seconds is roughly a nano-century.

Edit: 3.155 seconds. Pah! That's almost as bad as Indiana's Pi Bill.

The square root of gravitational constant g=9.81 is close to PI and we use that as a trick to cancel Pi^2 with g in physics all the time. Most students I teach don’t remember 11^2=121 to 19^2=361 so many numerical things I do on the board is like magic.

The square root of gravitational constant g=9.81

I can hardly bring myself to point out that the gravitational constant is a good deal smaller than that. About twelve orders of magnitude smaller.

No wonder the students think it magic.

355 / 113 is a much better approximation.

Yes, it is. It is also harder to remember, though.

"+Pi()"

To me, that looks screwy, because pi is constant, not a function. (but then, I never liked spreadsheets)