Hardware between computer and chip

Hi,
My first post.

I'm new to Arduino, and only speak BASIC. I am hoping to try to learn Arduino language, over Christmas.

I only want to do it if I can connect the computer to the chip to be programmed without and Arduino board.

I am working on radio chips, and previously I have blindly programmed an Arduino program to a radio chip 'module' (Including Atmega chip) via a USBASP USB adaptor. If this is possible, then that's what I want.

Can programming be done this way?

Cheers, Z0o0o.

Your description is not at all clear.

It is probably useful, if not quite essential, to have at least one Arduino board - an Uno is best as most things work with it.

If you have (say) an Atmega 328 on a breadboard and if it has the Arduino bootloader program on it you can upload a program from a PC using a USB-TTL cable. I do this regularly.

You can buy Atmega 328s with the bootloader installed.

However it is useful to be able to upload the bootloader yourself and that can be done with an Uno between the PC and another Atmega 328 on a breadboard. After the bootloader is installed you will not need to use the Uno if you prefer not to.

This tutorial explains the process.

...R

camerart:
I am hoping to try to learn Arduino language

There is no Arduino language.

camerart:
previously I have blindly programmed an Arduino program to a radio chip 'module' (Including Atmega chip) via a USBASP USB adaptor. If this is possible, then that's what I want.

Can programming be done this way?

Yes:

  • You may need to install a hardware package if your hardware configuration isn't compatible with one of the Arduino AVR Boards definitions included with the Arduino IDE. I can help you with that but would need more information to do so.
  • Select the correct hardware definition from Tools > Board.
  • Tools > Programmer > USBasp
  • You may need to do Tools > Burn Bootloader the first time you use your chip to set the fuses to your desired configuration.
  • Sketch > Upload Using Programmer

If your used to basic, you've got some stuff to learn..

Try the 'C' bible - 'the C programming language' by Kernighan and Ritchie. They devised it. You can download it free.

C++ is another step.

The arduino IDE incorporates both of these with some extensions.

regards

Allan