Hardware "if-then"

Hello to the community,

I am in search of a circuitry in which upon closing a switch a signal is send via a simple 433mhz module over to the respective receiver. As soon as this happens the circuit turns off. I am thinking of a simple logic gate but how do I know when the signal is fully sent in the first place. Maybe a transceiver gives me a feedback to work with. Again can I implement this without a MC? Maybe with the help of a HT12 IC ? Thank you in advance.

Before you ask a question, you need to tell us what your INITIAL CONDITIONS are .
e.g.: Do you have a circuit (built) ?
If so , where is the schematic ?
What , if anything have you tried yet ?

433 Mhz radios are sold in pairs: one transmitter, one reciever.
There is no "transceiver" so asking about one is not relevant.
If you have the pair, it should be obvious that the output of the receiver mimics the logic state
of the transmitter , so a pushbutton or switch to change the state from H to L on the transmitter
should result in the same logic at the output of the receiver. An MC is absolutely not required.

If you take this example and replace the arduino with a resistor pullup to 5V and a switch to short the Din
to GND, would the transmitter 'KNOW" that the input is not coming from an MC ?
Or, would it simply send the logic signal you input by pushing the button , without 'caring' that it is not
coming from an MC ?
But speaking of MCs, how do plan to implement an HT12 RF Decoder without an MC ? (with dipswitches ? toggle switches ? pushbuttons ? Not seein' it.)

These radios are about as simple as it gets. One wonders why it is necessary to ask the question.
One can only assume you have never used one and in fact do not even have one, otherwise you
wouldn't be asking the question.

Another thing, this circuit would be triggered by absolutely any 433 MHz transmitter in the vicinity. So, any garage door opener, remote thermometer, etc. The thermometers transmit every few minutes.

You could modify one of the pushbutton remote TX/RX 315 or 433 MHz pairs, sold by Adafruit among others.

TX and RX units have single chip encoders/decoders, with a simple security code built in, which helps to avoid false triggers.

how do I know when the signal is fully sent in the first place

Presumably you will be in control of the message that is sent. If so then take a look at Serial input basics - updated

I am a novice I admit it. I do not have a schematic but let me rephrase the whole question by telling a story: You power your circuit whatever this is.Let us say it is a handheld button-pressed remote. The RF module powers up and starts to emit its signal. You couldn't possibly know that the signal ever reached the receiver having a sole picture of the transmitter. So a good practise is to keep the circuit powered up long enough to lets say emit three times its code.
Now let's say I use a transceiver and not a 433mhz module. Is the use of a MC mandatory then to make sure that my signal was well-received and thus to use that information to whatever I want to do? (in my case turn off the circuit)

Now take away the button and replace it with a Reed Switch. You understand that my main concern is to minimize power consuption as long the reed switch is open.

CASE: A window opens--> circuit powers up--> signal is sent--> circuit powers off

Maybe the simplest solution is a delay circuitry but what is the most robust one? Take note that I need to use the cheapest solution and I also need to solve this puzzle hardware-side.

Maybe the simplest solution is a delay circuitry but what is the most robust one? Take note that I need to use the cheapest solution and I also need to solve this puzzle hardware-side.

For years my favourite simple delay or oscillator circuit was a CMOS 40106 hex Schmidt trigger with a capacitor and a resistor or 2. Dead simple and robust.

You still haven't explained WHY you are sending the
signal and what happens at the receiving end.
You only explained 'when' you send the signal.
Are you trying to make a burgler alarm ?

"For years my favourite simple delay or oscillator circuit was a CMOS 40106 hex Schmidt trigger with a capacitor and a resistor or 2. Dead simple and robust."

So that's what those are for !
I just came across two of those chips when I was
organizing my electronics stuff last weekend.
For seven years my wife complained it was unorganized so I finnslly went all out:
(good timing because I'm doing some arduino
stuff at work)

The most mysterious part of the puzzle: why do you want to avoid a MCU? It may be simpler, smaller and cheaper than other solutions. Strictly speaking probably anything a MCU can handle can can also be done without a MCU, with discrete parts or logic gates but why?
The second mystery: how do you plan to confirm your signal was correctly received? Do you have a different feedback? Or you really plan to use a transceiver? Did you consider the nRF24L01?

Or you really plan to use a transceiver?

I'm assuming this is a reference to the nRF24L0 , since there is no such thing as a 433 Mhz transceiver.

CASE: A window opens--> circuit powers up--> signal is sent--> circuit powers off

Are you trying to figure out when your teenage daughter is sneaking out in the middle of the night to meet her boyfriend ?

raschemmel:
there is no such thing as a 433 Mhz transceiver.

SI4432 is what? I think there is much more examples.

SI4432 is what? I think there is much more examples.

Quite frankly, referencing a $72 IC that a noob would have zero chance of figuring out how to use, let alone
program is absurd , to say the least. If you had linked a $15 part that is plug & play simple I would have
conceded that you are correct. As it is , I concede that you are correct and your solution is ridiculous to
post for a newbie. (so there)

Something like this would have been more appropriate.

There's tech and then there's tech that isn't for everyone (not plug & play).
Recommendations for noobs should be kept in the realm of feasible , not way out tech that requires
the user to be an engineer.
This is at least 'plausible' , but still a bit much for someone who's never even used an arduino or done
any programming.

If I had taken the time to Google '433 Mhz tranceiver', I would probably have chosen this:, in all reality , would require the OP to
take a crash course in Arduino and then another one in 'using libraries'. Doable, but not any time soon.

For $72 is some fancy development kit (official AVR development kits also cost fortune, I don't know why). Breakout boards for SI4432 (clone?) with all the support components needed cost about $3 on eBay. The programming is complicated but nRF24 is not trivial neither.

Big thanks to you all for your replies.

I now have many approaches to start with. I 'll do some research to choose the optimal one. I guess that such a circuit could be considered as a small burglar sensor. Replying to one of you, the receiving part needs to receive the signal just once for it to proceed with further actions. further triggers doesn't affect it.
I have used nrf24 before to be honest but in modules that were quite big for my needs. I guess there are low-profiled solutions.

raschemmel:
I'm assuming this is a reference to the nRF24L0 , since there is no such thing as a 433 Mhz transceiver.

Complete nonsense, plenty of them out there, here's a pageful: Sub-1GHz transceiver IC - HOPE MicroElectronics

And another: https://cpc.farnell.com/c/electrical-lighting/wireless-systems-modules/rf-modules/rf-transceivers-sub-2-4ghz/prl/results

And that's not including LoRa devices!!

Noted.
Are any of those simple enough for the OP to use?
Why don't you link a tutorial on how to use one
them for the OP ? Otherwise , what's the point ?
Proven I jumped the gun and didn't do my homework this time isn't going to get the OP
any closer to a solution . He doesn't need two
pages of ads for devices he doesn't know how
to use. All he needs is ONE link to one tutorial on how to use one of them. Yes I was wrong, now
forget about me and help the OP.