Has anybody seen these nice "doughnuts" for easy soldering?

Check these out, guys:

SOLDER, RINGS,FOR THROUGH HOLE,50 PCS,GAUGE .020

https://www.jameco.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?storeId=10001&langId=-1&catalogId=10001&productId=2117114

I know how to solder, but I think I'll order some of these just to try them. They seem like a very good alternative for those who are learning how to solder or who are still "afraid" of trying.

I hope this is of help.

that's really nice ö but very expensive, €6 for only 50 pieces seems a lot to me..

but it is really good to learn or to make it easier, i might get one set too, just to try it out :)

That looks like a really expensive solution looking for a non-existent problem

I agree, EXPENSIVE they are! But when you have never soldered an IC socket or chip, I guess that’s a jumpstart way to learn how to do it. And then forget about these expensive tiny doughnuts. :wink:

It seems like these would teach bad-soldering habits more than it would help to teach how to solder.

The solder should not come in contact with the iron's tip, which is what these things look like they are intended to do...

The data sheet does indeed show you are supposed to touch the solder with the iron.

Also it shows all its examples on a board with very large plated thru holes, that the solder 'fills up'.

Would be interesting to see how well they perform on veroboard or something, as the rings are much bigger than the component legs.

And as everyone seems to be saying, the price :fearful: That's more than a bobbin of solder, which will do hundreds if not thousands of legs...

Products like this are why I like to say: "There is no such thing as a stupid product. Only the people who buy it."

The large holed, plated thru board in the video is a 'SchmartBoard' by the same company, also supposed to make soldering easy,

They offer a free sample on their website, I guess it's restricted to the US though http://www.schmartboard.com/index.asp?page=schmartland_samples

Maybe some people could give it a go, we might be missing the best thing since sliced bread (in the circuit prototyping world).

Edit: It appears I have confused/misled myself, The free sample may be for their 'Hand soldering surface mount IC' board, which genuinely look quite interesting. http://www.schmartboard.com/schmartboard_dc_ez_instructions.pdf

They are also lead/tin solder rather than lead-free.

It must be soul-destroying work threading them all onto the leads of a DIP package only to sneeze and have them all scatter to the floor!

geez bend a pin or 2 $)

though its good to see jameco finally got with it and offers USPS shipping now, ... it used to piss me off so bad to order one little piddle squat item (like a tip for my iron) and see the bill jump up darn near 10 bucks for UPS or fedex ground, its why I have been using the same tip for almost 3 years with lots of care ... though its getting really close to time for a new one

nevermind they managed to cheese me off, now if you just want a 4$ soldering iron tip they charge you 5 extra bucks to meet their minimum order requirement ... and of course their selection is quite ... um ... thin so its even harder to get stuff, that cost more, at jameco

The solder should not come in contact with the iron’s tip

Hmm. That’s not what I was taught. “solder, tip, wire, and pad should all intersect” (more or less.)
I think AWOL’s comment was perfect, though. Soldering TH really isn’t that hard…

The solder should not come in contact with the iron's tip Hmm. That's not what I was taught. "solder, tip, wire, and pad should all intersect" (more or less.

The point is the two materials in the joint need to be heated to soldering temperature before the final correct amount of solder is applied. This may not work well with a clean soldering iron tip and the two parts to be soldered because there is mostly small-point contact.


Adding a very small amount of solder/flux right at the junction of the iron tip and the two parts right at the beginning often really improves the heat transfer between the 3 surfaces. When the solder suddenly flows it's your visual indicator that the temperature is correct.

THEN apply the correct final amount of solder and it flows fast and you're done.


I realized years ago that I had evolved to doing that and I teach people to solder that way, usually with good results.

Other Subject:

Prototyping Boards that solder well:

Some examples were given above.

I can find lots of low-cost protoboards, both single and double-sided, but they do NOT have plated-through holes.

What are YOUR favorites (links, please) from various sources. Any on Ebay??

I want to add good prototyping support to http://YourDuino.com

DISCLAIMER: Mentioned .. my own shop...

Are you looking for our favorite prototyping boards, Or our favorite plated-through hole prototyping boards?

Are you looking for our favorite prototyping boards, Or our favorite plated-through hole prototyping boards?

Sorry! I wasn’t specific enough…

Mainly plated-through proto boards, including those that may have surface-mount sections. I am looking at boards that could be used by serious experimenters/developers and support using sockets and connectors that would have secure connections to both sides.

That said, if someone really likes a board without plated-through and finds it productive and cost-effective I’d like see that too!

I may have some boards built… if anyone has Eagle/other files for a board they like, I’d like to see that too :slight_smile:

Thanks!

I don't really use plated through proto-board, so I cant really help there. Normally I build on breadboard, (obviously) then move to matrix board with point to point wiring http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/MATRIX-CIRCUIT-BOARD-PROTOTYPING-PCB-750-HOLE-94X71mm-/160499456041?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_3&hash=item255e835829#ht_2956wt_905 very cheap and personally I find it a lot easier than strip board.

Then I etch on double sided copper clad board, but I lay it out carefully as I know my holes wont be plated through.

But Matrix board gets my vote for quick, cheap, hassle free prototyping. XD

terryking228: Mainly plated-through proto boards, including those that may have surface-mount sections. I am looking at boards that could be used by serious experimenters/developers and support using sockets and connectors that would have secure connections to both sides.

That said, if someone really likes a board without plated-through and finds it productive and cost-effective I'd like see that too!

I may have some boards built.. if anyone has Eagle/other files for a board they like, I'd like to see that too :)

Thanks!

Something like this? http://www.aztecmcu.com/catalog/i44.html

I like the Velleman ECS1/2 "island of holes" boards for prototyping. High quality, evenly spaced hole with good pads. Board is the same 80x100mm that free version of eagle supports too, so if the prototype fits, am pretty sure an eagle created version will fit.

ECS1-H for bigger projects, 100x160mm.

I don't do much point to point soldering tho, preferring wirewrap/sockets for everything. Way easier to fix mistakes or to implement design changes.

I don’t do much point to point soldering tho, preferring wirewrap/sockets for everything.

I used to wirewrap everything too; I had access to IBM proto boards with plated through holes and voltage and ground planes. I wonder what the response would be if I included some wirewrap sockets and pins, and wire in my Prototyping offerings.

How many people feel wirewrap [(c)Gardner-Denver] is something they now use or might use??

Anyone know of a good low-cost stripper and wrap tool??

Oh, and an UNwrap tool. Unless you’re a lot better than me…

I do a lot with the Vero wire system, I have been using it for years and as long as you don't use it for power distribution it is fine.

I also have a supply of funnelets which are small tapered hollow tubes that you can use to effectively make a plated through hole for use on a home made double sided PCB. I have had them for many years and I don't know if they sell them any more. I can remember they were horrendously expensive but I needed them to mound an IC on the wrong side of the board after a layout error.