Help me-

Hello, guys. I'm a newbie and I have no idea about breakouts and Electronics. But I'd like to use Voice recording breakout - ISD1932 for recording and playback. How can i use this one? I don't know how to connect it to arduino, and I have no idea about programming, also.

If you have any basic examples about this breakout or if you have experience about it, please send it to my email(ask2mk@gmail.com) or give me an explanation.

Thanks.

I think you're talking about this one: http://www.sparkfun.com/products/9579 The schematic shows the connections going to pins on the arduino. I haven't used the product, but it looks like some intermediate users in the comments were having problems. I have used the waveshield http://www.ladyada.net/make/waveshield/ for audio, but you have to solder it together yourself, and buy a memory card + memory card programmer for it. If you want to get into the Arduino in general though, I would suggest doing some of the LED beginner tutorials to get the feel for the programming.

Hi,

I just looked at the sparkfun page and read the comments, I guess… not
many are happy with it.

Searching on ISD1932 and Arduino, I didn’t find an example of how to get it working but…
I didn’t search hard, so there might someone who did get it working with an Arduino.

More important is probably that you don’t know much about electronics and programming yet.
I’m no expert in both either, but know it can be quite (eh… very) frustrating to build & program
something I don’t understand yet.

If I were you I’d probably start with getting to know the Arduino-board and its
programming language. By following the tutorials, the many examples and a little experimenting
it will teach you a lot about electronics at the same time.
Most components used in the tutorial don’t cost much, you might even find them for free
if you open an old piece of electronics you never use.

Buying something without knowing something about it is often not a good idea when building
electronics, it costs loads of money and whether the end-result will be what you want
remains a question. Quite often… something may look and even work nice, but 2-3 months
after building you may discover a way to do it much easier/cheaper/better.

I’ve been playing with this break out board (BOB-09579 from SFE), and so far I have had mixed success. I wired it up following the datasheet’s sample schematics (direct mode), and while it’s definitely recording, all I’m really getting is static. Now, I am getting the correct amount of static (Sagan’s Contact is just begging for a reference here…), so the recorder seems to be working. I suspect the problem may be my microphone circuitry. I’m using an electret microphone, may try a condenser instead. I don’t really know audio circuits at all, so this part of it is just trial-and-error.

I’m not using an Arduino at all right now (except as a power source), just a push-button to trigger a given memory cell. Once I get the kinks out of the recorder circuitry, I believe I’ll be able to easily use an arduino (or xBee, which is my real goal) digital output pin in place of the button.

I’m using an electret microphone, may try a condenser instead

An electret is is a condenser.

AWOL:

I’m using an electret microphone, may try a condenser instead

An electret is is a condenser.

LOL. As I said, I don’t really understand audio circuits at all. The problem wasn’t the mike, it was that I plugged the mike directly into the break-out board mic+ and mic- pins, and that didn’t work. Once I wired up the mike as shown in the datasheet, it worked fine. I’m attaching the wiring diagram for what I did, it works great with an Arduino controlling it.

Some notes on the schematic: This is for direct mode only - the switch on the breakout board must be set to direct. S1 controls whether I want to record or playback. R1 was chosen to maximize sampling rate, a different value will allow lower sampling rate but more storage time. As shown, the ISD is set for 2 messages. If you want more, you’ll need to set the FMC pins (FMC1, FMC2, and XCLK) according to the datasheet, and wire more of the S and E pins to your arduino (or pushbutton). The mike is an electret microphone from SFE (http://www.sparkfun.com/products/8635), the speaker is a miniature speaker (8Ohm) from Radio Shack (http://www.radioshack.com/product/index.jsp?productId=2062406)

Note that the circuit works just as well with no arduino - just place a push button connecting S0 and S1 to ground.

BOB ISD1932.png

Here's a question for someone who understands this audio stuff better than me:

I want to have the same exact message on 2 (or more) of these ISD1932 chips at the same time. Can I just wire the same mike (and supporting capacitors and resistors) to 2 of these boards in parallel? Would that work? Or can I not split the audio signal in that fashion?

how can we record a voice in isd1932. i have referred its datasheet and got the circutry.how to proceed recording.i have used push buttons.

Can I just wire the same mike (and supporting capacitors and resistors) to 2 of these boards in parallel? Would that work? Or can I not split the audio signal in that fashion?

I think you you can put 2-3 boards in parallel, data sheets says chip 18 kOhm on mic input. You need R2/R3/R4 C3 only on one of the board.

What am i supposed to set s0 and s1 to do?