help on hooking up IRL540BPF

Hello,
I am building a irrigation system fully powered by 12V battery.
The final configuration will be addressed for an arduino PRO MINI or NANO.
I am following the schematic proposed by Larry:


I am not sure I have hooked up all the wires correctly.
I attached two photos.
Could you please help me to double check that everything is right.
In particular, I do not understand the reason and if I hooked up the resistances in series correctly.
Thanks for the help

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IMG_1792.JPG

IMG_1793.JPG

IMG_1792.JPG

That looks OK apart from the ground from the battery is attached to the bottom positive rail.

Breadboard isn't any good at handling current and will melt/spark/catch fire if you over-do things. Use something with low current requirements instead of the motor to test everything.

The 220 resistor limits current on the gate of the mosfet, the 10k holds the gate LOW while the Arduino is booting up.

Martin-X:
That looks OK apart from the ground from the battery is attached to the bottom positive rail.

Breadboard isn't any good at handling current and will melt/spark/catch fire if you over-do things. Use something with low current requirements instead of the motor to test everything.

The 220 resistor limits current on the gate of the mosfet, the 10k holds the gate LOW while the Arduino is booting up.

Thanks for spotting the mistake.

Not really sure if I ll able to avoid the use of the breadboard. The water pump is a small pump for aquarium and consume 3.8w. The current shouldn’t be too high, hopefully. I need to save also power since it will be battery powered.

The two resistors are in series? if so, it is not like having an equivalents resistance of 1/220+1/10k = 1/r?
thanks

Not really sure if I ll able to avoid the use of the breadboard.

You need to learn how to solder. The breadboard tracks will burn if you try to power motors or solenoids through them.

Breadboards are for experimenting only, and not intended for permanent installations like irrigation controllers.

Sparkfun and Adafruit have good soldering tutorials.

jremington:
You need to learn how to solder. The breadboard tracks will burn if you try to power motors or solenoids through them.

Breadboards are for experimenting only, and not intended for permanent installations like irrigation controllers.

Sparkfun and Adafruit have good soldering tutorials.

I bought a soldering station already. I will look for those tutorials.
Do i need to create a pcb?

Or this could be ok
https://learn.sparkfun.com/tutorials/large-solderable-breadboard-hookup-guide/all

a solderable breadboard?

I use PCBs that are intended for permanent (soldered) prototyping.

You can buy a variety of them, like this one or this one or this one (which will fit on an Arduino Mega).

jremington:
I use PCBs that are intended for permanent (soldered) prototyping.

You can buy a variety of them, like this one or this one or this one (which will fit on an Arduino Mega).

I bought the adafruit perma-proto and I am almost ready to finalize my project.
I made a change with respect to the original schematics of the first post in order to have 2 batteries,
a 12V for the water pump and 4.5V for the Arduino Pro Mini.

The new schematics is here:


The red connection is the part I modified from the original one.
Just if you can confirm that I did not create any short circuit or that I am not sending 12V to the Pro Mini that will kill it
much appreciated

Please read and follow the instructions in posting images in line.

The diagram is fine, but the capacitor across the motor terminals should be about 100 nF, not 100 uF.

jremington:
Please read and follow the instructions in posting images in line.

The diagram is fine, but the capacitor across the motor terminals should be about 100 nF, not 100 uF.

Thanks for the reply
Can I still use 100uF?
What will be the consequences?

Yes, there will be consequences.

A 100 uF cap is far less effective than 100 nF in reducing fast voltage spikes and radio frequency noise.

jremington:
Yes, there will be consequences.

A 100 uF cap is far less effective than 100 nF in reducing fast voltage spikes and radio frequency noise.

I took this capacitor because it is the same used on the arduino starter kit project 5 for the servo motor.
My water pump should be a dc motor and I do not know if it is subjected by fast voltage spikes.

Your pump will generate fast voltage spikes, and a 100 nF capacitor is a useful way to reduce them. Whoever put the Arduino starter kit together is misguided.

If you want to learn more about these very basic principles, here is a good, short tutorial.

DC motors have brushes that can spark and create loads of RF interference. 100nF is good for that. Servos have them fitted internally.

The 100uF is for a completely different purpose (and not much good even for that).

Steve

Thank you for the replies.
I got it now
I will read the tutorial proposed by jremington.

AntroxEv:
Can I still use 100uF?
What will be the consequences?

You most certainly cannot use the 100 µF if you proposed to use PWM (to control motor speed). That would cause a lot of problems.

Even just switching on occasionally it is briefly overloading the IRL540.

Paul__B:
You most certainly cannot use the 100 µF if you proposed to use PWM (to control motor speed). That would cause a lot of problems.

Even just switching on occasionally it is briefly overloading the IRL540.

Thanks for the reply.

I am not using PWM, I just use simple digitalwrite(PIN,HIGH) to activate the pump without controlling the water flow.

By the way, I have just found out that I should have 100nF and 100pF in my starterkit .
One capacitor is oval and orange, another is light blue and rectangular.
But not able to read which one is each one.
The blue one is labelled mu 1J63, the orange 101 Suntan.

1J63 should be 1000nF not 100nF
101 should be 100pF

but the list of components indicates that I should have 100nF

It should be the blue one but how to understand the polarity?
No grey dash as in the 100uF

Only electrolytic capacitors have polarity.

Paul__B:
Only electrolytic capacitors have polarity.

I am talking about the blue capacitors in this image


I cannot find any info if it is electrolytic or not

It is impossible to read and/or make sense of the markings in that picture, of course.

However, the blue capacitors are not electrolytic, and they are not 100 uF. Where did you get them?