Help on my research idea: storm surge detecting and warning lighthouse

I can say that I am a beginner. Pardon me

My idea is to make a storm surge detecting and warning lighthouse that changes the color of the revolving beam to red (or maybe from the default-white- then to orange and then red) and also triggers an alarm when there is an incoming storm surge.

The factors to be used in detecting will be rise of water level and wind speed (and wind direction? I'm not sure.) I've been watching multiple Arduino tutorials videos on youtube on water level sensoring and wind speed and direction. But I have not really tried to do it myself.

Is my idea possible? Can I combine water level and wind speed alarm? Does the lighthouse warning system make sense to you guys? Any tips?

Sorry for the bad english.

Can I combine water level and wind speed alarm?

Yes. The first step is to get an Arduino and learn how they work by following the introductory tutorials.

Then learn to read water level and wind speed sensors, and see how well you can do at predicting storms.

Just been to a Geek fest in Hebden Bridge, Wuthering Bytes.

They were badly flooded a few years back, see here and what they did about monitoring;

https://www.rs-online.com/designspark/a-flood-sensor-network-for-calderdale

I was in that Co-Operative food store on Thursday buying cakes.

andreaterbio:
But I have not really tried to do it myself.

Then you should start, make the sensors work first.

andreaterbio:
My idea is to make a storm surge detecting and warning lighthouse

If you mean a surge in sea levels I reckon it would be next to impossible to detect it until it was too late to be useful.

There is also the serious risk that rough seas would destroy your water level sensor even at a storm level far below the strength that would cause problems.

For rivers (such as the problem at Hebden bridge) the rate of rainfall would be a useful predictor - rain falling faster than the drains and rivers can handle.

Are you hoping to make a better prediction than the meteorological service and the rivers agency?

…R

Robin2:
If you mean a surge in sea levels I reckon it would be next to impossible to detect it until it was too late to be useful.

This. By the time the water starts rising it's too late. It's really easy to predict storm surge based on the weather and that generally gives days of notice, whereas this might give minutes.

Perhaps a device that picks up the surge warnings from the coast guard and sets up a signal from the lighthouse would be more useful.

Storm surges are the result of extremely low barometric pressure, so a barometer would also be a great sensor to use.

Paul

Paul_KD7HB:
Storm surges are the result of extremely low barometric pressure, so a barometer would also be a great sensor to use.

Paul

Yes, but the surge would proceed the barometric lowest point which is the eye. The surge comes from the rotating wind blowing the water.

It’s the same when you blow on a cup of tea to cool it- there will be a small tidal surge of the on the opposite side of your cup.

If the OP can’t get the Coast Guard surge prediction through an API, like we can get weather data from various services, then maybe he could alert when the sea level gets above a set pint

SteveMann:
Yes, but the surge would proceed the barometric lowest point which is the eye. The surge comes from the rotating wind blowing the water.

The worst storm surge I have seen was some 3m rise by typhoon Hato - making landfall some 300 km south of us! That came on top of an astonomical high; the maximum of the storm and the maximum monthly high were within a few hours of one another. Major flooding all over the city. At our neighbours in Macau it was worse, some 4-5m surge. That was still quite a way from the eye.

A year later Mangkut, also making landfall a couple hundred km south, gave a near 2m storm surge. Luckily no extreme high at that moment but still serious flooding.

So really, you don't have to be in the eye of the storm to see serious surges. The direction of the winds and the regular tides are at least as much of a factor. That you see several meters of surge is more than can be explained by just the pressure, pressure alone gives maybe a 1m surge, the rest is winds pushing the water towards the land. If you have the winds blow the opposite way, there will be no storm surge at all even with very low pressure.

In these cases the Observatory did warn for storm surges but not to what extent. That was clear only after the storm passed. That I remember the names should tell you something about the severity of the storms. I don't even remember the name of the typhoon that gave us a T8 warning signal about a month ago. We just enjoyed the day off.

To monitor such surges, your tidal gauge has to be mounted very securely, in a place where the waves don't break it. Storms are really destructive - after Mangkut several beaches lost all their trees, as in trees were completely gone, not just blown over.