Help transferring low latency audio wirelessly

Looking for any tips, existing walkthroughs, youtube video, other message forums on transferring audio from one device to another.

i've google-fu'ed and can't seem to find what i'm looking for.

I want to build my own battery powered surround bookshelf speakers and i'm looking for a way to transfer RCA output from the receiver to the speaker.

Looking for what Arduino, esp32, esp8266, etc... that I can use to accomplish this. Think it could be done over wifi or Bluetooth.

Each speaker would need a single channel of audio. Looking to start with 2 speakers then maybe up to 4, but i'm fine if each speaker needs to have it's own pair of devices.

This is all very possible, I've written a library for ESP32 that receives audio from a device(phone, laptop, MP3 player) and then outputs it on line out. you can replace the 3.5mm cable with a 3.5mm to RCA if you want.

Github Code
and
Instructable

when you say

hunterofshadows:
Each speaker would need a single channel of audio. Looking to start with 2 speakers then maybe up to 4, but i'm fine if each speaker needs to have it's own pair of devices.

by channel do you mean Left vs right or something else?
If so this is automatically taken care of in the code.

I haven't made this battery powered but the bluetooth code should still be useful.

Analog (AM or FM) has ZERO latency! :wink:

Bluetooth should be able to do it and Audio seems to be the most common use of Bluetooth, but I'm not sure exactly what Bluetooth can do and I'm not sure what latency you need.

I don't know what the minimum Wi-Fi latency is, but it would depend on the complexity of the network. Wi-Fi has error correction and collision detection, etc. It's optimized for data integrity (and overall speed). Latency is secondary. There are some networking protocols optimized for audio but I don't know how well they work over Wi-Fi.

I want to build my own battery powered surround bookshelf speakers and i'm looking for a way to transfer RCA output from the receiver to the speaker.

Take a look at [u]this[/u]

Hiii,

There are many different types of codecs available, all Bluetooth devices must support SBC at the very minimum. Let’s take a look at some examples of the different codecs available and what their purposes are:

• SBC (sub band codec) - most basic, ALL Bluetooth products must be able to support this. It has a noticeable 200-220 millisecond delay.

• LDAC - Sony’s proprietary BT audio codec with variable bit rate support.

• aptX - 48kHz/16-bit audio - better sound quality than SBC. Lower latency of about 100-170 milliseconds.

• aptX High Definition - 48kHz/24-bit audio - better sound quality than aptX.

• aptX Low Latency - 32-40 millisecond delay. Designed for video and gaming applications.

Regards,
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DVDdoug:
Analog (AM or FM) has ZERO latency! :wink:

Not actually true, as radio waves take time to move through space, and RF amps, tuned circuits,
antennas and modulators and demodulators add some phase-delay to the signal, but you'd expect
these to be measured in nanoseconds or microseconds rather than milliseconds.

In theory for digital signalling of sampled data you'd get the best latency only at the expense of
error correction - very low latency prohibits retries for error correction so you have to rely entirely on
forward error correction techniques, and these require a minimum block size to be able to correct
for burst noise (like lightning crackle).

However latency isn't such a big problem as every metre of travel through air from speaker to
ear adds 3ms of latency and no-one ever complains about this!

What might matter with multiple speakers is the difference in latency between different paths, leading
to phasing differences between speakers, and even varying phase differences (which will be
heard as panning of the sound around in space).