Help with arduino servo lock

Hi! We are trying to move a servo with a bluetooth arduino uno , the only problem we have is that ,
when we turn it on our servo moves to the right non stop and if we send him to move left it does it and then goes back to the right , if someone can help us wit this , thanks

#include <SoftwareSerial.h>
#include <Servo.h>
#include <EEPROM.h>
Servo servoMotor; // Declaramos la variable para controlar el servo
SoftwareSerial BT1(10, 11); // RX | TX
Servo servo;
char state;
char data;
void setup()
{ pinMode(8, OUTPUT);        // Al poner en HIGH forzaremos el modo AT
  pinMode(9, OUTPUT);        // cuando se alimente de aqui
  digitalWrite(9, HIGH);
  delay (500) ;              // Espera antes de encender el modulo
  Serial.begin(9600);        // Iniciamos el monitor serie para mostrar el resultado
  Serial.println("Levantando el modulo HC-06");
  digitalWrite (8, HIGH);    //Enciende el modulo
  Serial.println("Esperando comandos AT:");
  BT1.begin(9600);
  servoMotor.attach(7);  // Iniciamos el servo para que empiece a trabajar con el pin 7
  // codigo del chino
  if (EEPROM.read(0) == 1) // Reads the EEPROM value stored to know what state the door lock was in before it was last turned off
  { // An EEPROM value of 1 means UNLOCKED and a value of 2 means LOCKED
    servo.write(70); // Rotates the servo to the unlocked position
    delay(200);
  }
  else if (EEPROM.read(0) == 2)
  {
    servo.write(120); // Rotates the servo to the locked position
    delay(200);
    // arriba termina el codigo de tostada francesa sexy

  }
}

  void loop(){
   if (Serial.available() > 0)
      char data;
    data = Serial.read(); // The variable data is used to store the value sent by the Android app

    switch (data)
    {
      case '1':
        if (EEPROM.read(0) == 1) //An EEPROM value of 1 means it is currently unlocked
        {
          EEPROM.write(0, 2); // Writes the number 2 to address 0 on the Arduino's EEPROM. This value will be used by the Arduino to remember the last state the door lock was in
          Serial.print("3"); // Sends the number 3 to the Android app. To see what this does, please see the Android Studio Project file

          for (int a = 70; a <= 120; a++) // Rotates the servo to the locked position
          {
            servo.write(a);
            delay(15);
            Serial.println(servo.read());
          }
        }
        else if (EEPROM.read(0) == 2) //An EEPROM value of 2 means it i currently locked
        {
          EEPROM.write(0, 1); // Writes the number 1 to address 0 on the Arduino's EEPROM. This value will be used by the Arduino to remember the last state the door lock was in
          Serial.print("4"); // Sends the number 4 to the Android app. The number sent will be used by the app to update the locked/unlocked icon
          for (int x = 120; x >= 70; x--) // Rotates the servo to the unlocked position
          {
            servo.write(x);
            delay(15);
          }
        }
        break;
      case '3':
        // This part of the switch case statement is used everytime the Arduino is turned on
        // Basically, the Android app sends a command asking the Arduino to send the current state of the lock in order to accordingly update the locked/unlocked icon in the app
        if (EEPROM.read(0) == 1)
        {
          Serial.print("4");
        }
        else if (EEPROM.read(0) == 2)
        {
          Serial.print("3");
        }
        break;
    }
  }

Hi Juan, I had read that there is a timer conflict between the libraries for softwareserial and servo. Consider using ServoTimer2 instead of Servo.

Full disclaimer, I have not used SoftwareSerial so this is just what I picked up reading, not from actual use.

Why on earth is it necessary to keep reading from EEPROM? There is nothing that writes to EEPROM, except your code, so the value isn't going to magically change.

If the servo "moves to the right" continuously, it is NOT a servo. If the servo moves, stops, and moves back, then say that. Servos don't have right and left. They have clockwise and counter-clockwise.