Help with electronic components on breadboards

I got the arduino starter kit, and my components (ex the button switch or tilt sensor) doesnt fit in the breadboard you got with the package. When you push the items in they pop out.
This is very frustrating, how do I fix it? Should I request a new package and say that this one is "damaged" (even tho I think this problem occurs in almost every package)?

generally a breakout board or solder wires to the component.

The little tactile push switches do fit with a bit of persuasion, but only just.

MarkT:
generally a breakout board or solder wires to the component.

The little tactile push switches do fit with a bit of persuasion, but only just.

How does it come that they are designed like that?
I'd like to avoid soldering just because I want a more temporary solution while prototyping, and what is a breakout board?

If the components pop out, you have probably not pushed then far enough in.

I normally use a pair of needle nosed pliers to grab the legs an push them into the holes.

Peter_I:
--snip--

I see what you mean, but for example the tilt sensor got so short legs it pops even when its 100% "connected".

Maybe the pictures are a bit too unclear, but I hope you get my point.

I have to basically find a spot on the breadboard that doesn't pop it and go from there, therefore my circuits are pretty unorganized because of the strange positioning

The components are not designed to be inserted into breadboards but rather into printed circuit boards. The fact that some of them do fit nicely into breadboards is convenient. For the rest it's necessary to scratch one's head and figure out a way to get them working, Sometimes that means soldering on short wires of the appropriate size, for others adapter boards are necessary.

Breadboards are used for experimenting and prototyping. It wouldn't be cost effective for component manufacturers to design parts specifically to fit them.

RoyK:
The components are not designed to be inserted into breadboards but rather into printed circuit boards.
--snip--

So how do you get hands on printed circuit boards? 3D printer?

You might try a google search for printed circuit board

About 5,260,000 results (0.23 seconds) 8)

RoyK:
About 5,260,000 results (0.23 seconds) 8)

Yea because that is informative

RoyK:
You might try a google search for printed circuit board

But so you make a design and buy them online?
That's not what I am aiming for, maybe later but atm while testing and learning I wish to have a simple way to make my own circuit boards.
Can you buy like board templates that you can solder on?

Peter_I:
I normally use a pair of needle nosed pliers to grab the legs an push them into the holes.

How many breadboards have you broken?

That's not what I am aiming for, maybe later but atm while testing and learning I wish to have a simple way to make my own circuit boards.

a Google search for "make my own circuit boards" yields
About 19,900,000 results (0.43 seconds)

fungus:
How many breadboards have you broken?

None, I'm a gentle pusher.

Sometimes I solder breadboard wires to short legged components, or mount them on a small piece of veroboard. Then some sturdy pins of a proper length can be soldered to the veroboard.
(Components with short legs that have been desoldered from something else can also be handled that way)

RoyK:
a Google search for "make my own circuit boards"

Found this, a pretty good video explaining step by step how to make a homemade well done circuit board.
In one of the first steps she says you should print the circuit onto a magazine paper, does it have to be a magazine paper? Can you use a normal laser paper and get a similar result? It's only the ink that is important right, so it shouldn't matter?

Let's see. The video was made at MIT, a rather respected institution. They specifically said to print on glossy magazine paper. So no, I guess the type of paper doesn't matter.

It's a lot of trial and error when selecting a paper for toner transfer, but it's typically glossy paper. Don't be afraid to experiment with various papers and printers.

To "extend" pins you can use machined pin headers: 40-pin 1-row 0.1” PCB Female Machined Round Header - dipmicro electronics
For pins that are in an arrangement that just doesn't work with a breadboard use male-female wires: Female/Male Color Ribbon Flat Cable Jumper Dupont 40-wire 20cm 2.54mm - dipmicro electronics

FYI, those little pushbutton switches (and a lot of trimmers too) have those funny legs because they're designed to spring into place on a printed circuit board and hold themselves in during soldering. Here's one with "unfunny" legs that would work in a breadboard: Self-locking switch 8 x 8mm (Blue) - dipmicro electronics

Chagrin:
--snip--

That is more or less exactly what I was looking for. Thank you very much

Let's see. The video was made at MIT, a rather respected institution. They specifically said to print on glossy magazine paper. So no, I guess the type of paper doesn't matter.

It absolutely does matter. Don't think because magazine paper is cheap, that it doesn't matter. Glossy magazine paper is clay coated paper. Glossy ads may work, too. It depends on the exact toner in your laser printer.

I run Homebrew_PCBs on Yahoogroups. Some people use clay coated glossy inkjet paper, or foil transfer sheets, or some variety of glossy magazine or the Sunday ads. But don't think that means that just any paper will work.

polymorph:

Let's see. The video was made at MIT, a rather respected institution. They specifically said to print on glossy magazine paper. So no, I guess the type of paper doesn't matter.

It absolutely does matter. Don't think because magazine paper is cheap, that it doesn't matter.

I hear Digikey is having a sale on 1% tolerance sarcasm detectors.

Chagrin:
FYI, those little pushbutton switches (and a lot of trimmers too) have those funny legs because they're designed to spring into place on a printed circuit board and hold themselves in during soldering. Here's one with "unfunny" legs that would work in a breadboard: Self-locking switch 8 x 8mm (Blue) - dipmicro electronics

Is the pic below the "funny legs"? Always wondered why they're shaped like that!

switch.jpg