Help with selecting the right diode

Hi,

I am in the process of connecting an Arduino to a camera guided by this tutorial - Automatic Camera Shutter Switch | Make:

Apparently the setup needs a diode but the tutorial doesn't specify any in particular.

I'm wondering if anyone can help select the right one?

Thanks!

Any 400x series would do.

Any 10 cent diode would do the trick. It is not a high current/high voltage signal.
https://www.digikey.com/en/products/filter/diodes-rectifiers-single/280?s=N4IgjCBcoGwJxVAYygMwIYBsDOBTANCAPZQDaIALGGABxwDsIAuoQA4AuUIAyuwE4BLAHYBzEAF9CYOHUQgUkDDgLEyIAAzM2nSD37CxkkAFoATHIX8AripKRyAVi0gOXCYWMJo8qNdtqIFhcdEAkjc3sQABMBIijcZxg5ASiuYzB1CG03QnYAT1YE3XRsFHFxIA

Thanks

I'm going to buy these because if I were to buy a single diode with shipping it would end up the same price as the pack.

Will use the IN400 (Voltage RRM: 50V, Current: 30A) if only low specs are required

These diodes are not 30 Amp diodes. That Amazon link is wrong. They are 1A diodes.
The maximum reverse current is 30uA. Some idiot has looked at this and put down 30A current rating.

The advertisement is illegal in the UK under the trade descriptions act. The seller hasn’t got a clue as to what they are selling.

Thats a lot of money just to get 1 diode. Surely you have an electronics hobby store over there. I know I went to one in Exeter when I was visiting, I can't remember its name. Even Ebay would be cheaper. If you were in Australia I would send you some for postage cost.

Is it possible to source one from old electronic boards that you might have?

It is good to have more than a single diode.

The 30A rating is not misread reverse current but peak forward current rating. It may be misleading for a noob but I doubt it is illegal.

It may be misleading for a noob but I doubt it is illegal.

Know much about UK consumer law then?

Grumpy_Mike:
Know much about UK consumer law then?

Mike is absolutely correct. It is a false description and therefore is illegal under the Consumer Rights Act 2015.

xop:
Thanks

I'm going to buy these because if I were to buy a single diode with shipping it would end up the same price as the pack.

You don't need 100 misdescribed Chinese diodes! Send me your address in a PM and I will put a couple in the post FOC.

AJLElectronics:
Mike is absolutely correct. It is a false description and therefore is illegal under the Consumer Rights Act 2015.

Really? They say "Current: 30 A". The diode truly handles 30 A of peak current. They don't claim it is continuous 30 A. The seller may believe the inrush current limit is the most important feature. For some designs this may be true.

They don't claim it is continuous 30 A.

They don't have to in order for it to be misleading.

So the answer to my question:- "Know much about UK consumer law then?" is a resounding NO!

There is a direct analogy here between this claim and the claim of internet providers advertising say xxxMbit Wi-Fi. They didn't claim that you would get that speed all the time. Even when they claimed up to xxxMbit it was still ruled illegal because they said it gave a misleading expectation.

You really won't let this go will you Smajdalf? Stop trying to attack me at every possibility. But of course I know, that you think, you know better than anyone else. Time for a reality check.

The UK’s Consumer Rights Act 2015

I know nearly nothing about the UK law (or any other law). I just cannot imagine how advertising may work if this is considered misleading. With this logic nearly any claim could be attacked. "Hey, they did not say I need electricity for the computer to work!" or similar.
However I can imagine how your example with xxxMbit may be wrong. I guess the advertised value is nearly never obtained and real speeds are much lower. This is not the case of the diode: it can can safely pass a short non-repetitive 30 A pulse. Moreover it can be done when the user needs it, not only when "the stars are right."

AJLElectronics be more specific please. Which part of the Act the seller violates?

11Goods to be as described

(1)Every contract to supply goods by description is to be treated as including a term that the goods will match the description.
(2)If the supply is by sample as well as by description, it is not sufficient that the bulk of the goods matches the sample if the goods do not also match the description.
(3)A supply of goods is not prevented from being a supply by description just because—
(a)the goods are exposed for supply, and
(b)they are selected by the consumer.
(4)Any information that is provided by the trader about the goods and is information mentioned in paragraph (a) of Schedule 1 or 2 to the Consumer Contracts (Information, Cancellation and Additional Charges) Regulations 2013 (SI 2013/3134) (main characteristics of goods) is to be treated as included as a term of the contract.
(5)A change to any of that information, made before entering into the contract or later, is not effective unless expressly agreed between the consumer and the trader.
(6)See section 2(5) and (6) for the application of subsections (4) and (5) where goods are sold at public auction.
(7)See section 19 for a consumer’s rights if the trader is in breach of a term that this section requires to be treated as included in a contract.

The goods advertised are not as described because they contradict the manufacturers own description. Diodes (rectifier types) are not bought on the basis of how much of a peak pulse they can withstand, but on the basis of their constant current capability. The advertiser does not qualify his figure as peak pulse capability, so therefore "the man on the Clapham omnibus*" would expect it to be constant current as per the convention.

  • "The man on the Clapham omnibus" phrase is used in many legal arguments to indicate an opinion that would be expected to be held by the typical consumer, rather than a scientist etc.

It is clear that there is a push in England and Australia to legislate for genuine fair trading. The US is no doubt lagging behind badly.

Australian consumer law requires that goods are serviceable to a reasonable expectation of their lifetime rather than a specified warranty period - whichever is the longer.

The Amazon listing (corrected: https://www.amazon.co.uk/TeOhk-Rectifier-Assortment-1N4001-1N4007-1N5817-1N5819/dp/B07RXJMTWR/) is clearly completely misleading and would be illegal, notwithstanding the item is “Currently unavailable” and no price given. I suspect it is a very expensive presentation box!

I recommend xop accept AJLElectronics’ offer in a PM. :sunglasses: I would make the same offer in Australia. :grinning:

For this purpose, a 1N8914/ 1N4148 would be more than sufficient.

Have any transistors lying around? You can use the B-C junction as a diode (or E-B with limitations).

Paul__B:
Australian consumer law requires that goods are serviceable to a reasonable expectation of their lifetime rather than a specified warranty period - whichever is the longer.

Ours is similar. The concept of a "12 month guarantee" is largely forgotten. Goods must be of satisfactory quality, fit for the purpose and as described. There is a six year window for a claim to be brought against a seller for an "inherent defect". For the first six months, it is up to the retailer to prove that it doesn't have an inherent fault, thereafter the consumer needs an independant report which has to be refunded if positive. The retailer has one opportunity to get it sorted, before a mandatory refund is due (which can be pro-rata).

Paul__B:
Australian consumer law requires that goods are serviceable to a reasonable expectation of their lifetime rather than a specified warranty period - whichever is the longer.

Which is the "Man on the Clapham omnibus" argument. Clearly a £10 toaster would not be expected to last very long, but a £500+ TV? Most of us would be expecting 6-10 years before any attention was required.