Help With Volume Adjustment Digital Potentiometer

I am a beginner with wiring microchips and have never used a digital potentiometer.

What my project requires is taking audio through a 3.5mm plug and then adjusting the volume and outputting it through another 3.5mm plug (ranging from silence to original volume).

Coding the arduino itself will not be an issue, but I have no clue what to do for wiring.

What is a good digital potentiometer to purchase?

Also, would a friendly member here guide through what resistors or capacitors I need for wiring? I am extremely confused why resistors or capictors are even necessary for wiring the digital potentiometer to the arduino, but I've seen photos of similar projects with people using them.

Thanks!

Have a look at the PGA2311 digital volume control chip. It's always my choice for audio volume control, and easy to drive with an Arduino.

Ian.

ian332isport:
Have a look at the PGA2311 digital volume control chip. It's always my choice for audio volume control, and easy to drive with an Arduino.

Ian.

Thanks for the reply, Ian.

I honestly haven't really done much circuit work, but I have programming experience. What resources should I read up on for wiring up a PGA2311? I see a few projects with people using them, but it is unclear how they are being wired. Is there a diagram I should reference? Also, what is the purpose of the resistors and capacitors in a simple volume changing circuit? Isn't original current/voltage just being modified in my case, so they are unnecessary?

Thanks!

RedyTedy:
Thanks for the reply, Ian.

I honestly haven't really done much circuit work, but I have programming experience. What resources should I read up on for wiring up a PGA2311? I see a few projects with people using them, but it is unclear how they are being wired. Is there a diagram I should reference? Also, what is the purpose of the resistors and capacitors in a simple volume changing circuit? Isn't original current/voltage just being modified in my case, so they are unnecessary?

Thanks!

What resistors and capacitors?

Also, what will this circuit be driving? Will it go to a line input, or do you want it to drive speakers?

Jiggy-Ninja:
What resistors and capacitors?

Also, what will this circuit be driving? Will it go to a line input, or do you want it to drive speakers?

I plan to output the audio to a 3.5mm jack where I will be able to plug in headphones as if they were coming from the original source, just with a modified volume (ranging from silence to the original volume).

I am completely lost when it comes to adding resistors/capacitors in this case. Why and when would they be necessary?

An example is this breakout board that uses a dual channel digital potentiometer. It clearly has various resistors I assume I would need even if I weren't using a breakout board:

RedyTedy:
I plan to output the audio to a 3.5mm jack where I will be able to plug in headphones as if they were coming from the original source, just with a modified volume (ranging from silence to the original volume).

I am completely lost when it comes to adding resistors/capacitors in this case. Why and when would they be necessary?

An example is this breakout board that uses a dual channel digital potentiometer. It clearly has various resistors I assume I would need even if I weren't using a breakout board:
AK-MCP4241 – Dual Digital 10K Potentiometer Breakout | Artekit Labs

There's a link to the schematic on that page. Take a look at it.

The capacitor is a 0.1uF ceramic across the power lines, which every digital chip must have as close to the power pins as physically possible. This is absolutely required.

The resistors are 100k pullups on WP (Write Protect) and SHDN (Shutdown) so that they are HIGH even if you leave them unconnected. These are optional, and will depend on what (if anything) you connect to these pins.

Thoroughly study the data sheet for any chip that you decide to use, and it will tell you what all the pins do and how to operate the device. They are daunting documents at first (especially for microcontrollers), but you don't need to read the whole thing from start to finish, you just need to know which parts are important.