Help with wiring a differnetial pressure sensor with arduino!

Hello,
Good day!

I am quite familiar with arduino but not as much with electricity.
So I bought an differential pressure transmitter which has an output of 5 V.
Now my plan is to read it with arduino after that through an ESP8266 to contact it to IoT.

The sensor is very expensive so I am not sure how to wire it,
can you watch the attached photo and give me some information or
a reference of how to wire the sensor.

thank you in advance!

p.s. the product is: testo 6321

a.JPG

Model no. ?? (need to se its datasheet to confirm how to use)

You will probably need a differential op amp to convert the output to 0 to 5v. Do a Google search for "differential op amp".

knut_ny:
Model no. ?? (need to se its datasheet to confirm how to use)

This is the web page of the product:

https://www.testo.com/product/0555+6321/testo-6321-testo-6321-Differential-Pressure-Transmitter#tab-4

When I ordered the product I asked for the product that output 0-5 V.

You need a 24V supply and a burden resistor (in fact a resistive divider).

The device needs a supply betweet 20 and 30V, and has a 20mA current output.

You would use connection plan 2 from the brochure and the resitive load could be
two 220 ohm resistors in series, with the midpoint feeding an analog pin via a 10k
serial resistor (protection from over voltage).

20mA into 440 ohms gives 8.8V and the divider provides 4.4V to the arduino on
full-scale.

If you don't know about 20mA current loop interfaces do some reading. You should
have gone for the version with 5V voltage output in the first place, much easier.

Then why post pictures of the current loop 4 wire connection?

MarkT:
You need a 24V supply and a burden resistor (in fact a resistive divider).

The device needs a supply betweet 20 and 30V, and has a 20mA current output.

You would use connection plan 2 from the brochure and the resitive load could be
two 220 ohm resistors in series, with the midpoint feeding an analog pin via a 10k
serial resistor (protection from over voltage).

20mA into 440 ohms gives 8.8V and the divider provides 4.4V to the arduino on
full-scale.

If you don’t know about 20mA current loop interfaces do some reading. You should
have gone for the version with 5V voltage output in the first place, much easier.

This is a 5v voltage output version.
I ordered this way so I can connect my arduino

Then just connect the 5V output via a 10k resistor (again to prevent over-voltage damage or
damage if the Arduino is powered down when the sensor is powered up.)