Help with wiring this 4-20mA sensor.

I'm having a hard time understanding this schematic. This laser sensor outputs either voltage of analog value. Since the input is 12v to 30vdc, the signal out would be in the range too? I would have to step it down to 0-5v correct? I could instead use the 4-20mA export and analog read this correct?

I have it currently supplied with 12V. The input option is if I want to remotely turn it on/off. By default it is always on.

I'm having a bit of trouble of reading how to wire this up correctly. Any help? The schematic is attached.

TIA |500x281

I can't tell what you have.

Post a link to the datasheet for the item.

Hello, It's a laser distance gauge. Here is a data sheet.

http://info.bannerengineering.com/cs/groups/public/documents/literature/175093.pdf

and here is a better picture of the wiring diagram.

thanks!

|500x226

I am not sure why you are posting about this product on the Arduino forum.

It is a self-contained unit that certainly does not require an Arduino to operate.

It has the ability to send external analog values as well. This item is commonly used with PLC, while it does give a read out, I would like to have events triggered from it's registered values by an Arduino.

carboxyll: It has the ability to send external analog values as well. This item is commonly used with PLC, while it does give a read out, I would like to have events triggered from it's registered values by an Arduino.

What makes you think it can be "triggered" by an Arduino?

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ieee488: What makes you think it can be "triggered" by an Arduino?

OP is not asking to trigger the machine, but to trigger other events.

The machine provides a 4-20 mA output. Those outputs can readily be read by Arduino - do a search on this forum on how this works. There are many threads about it.

wvmarle: OP is not asking to trigger the machine, but to trigger other events.

Then what he wrote to have events triggered from it's registered values by an Arduino. should be worded more precisely.

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A single resistor is basically enough for this. Add a few extra components for stability (overvoltage protection). Read the resulting 0-5V signal with a regular analog input (or with different resistor values you can create a 0-1.1V signal and use the more stable internal reference to read this). No need for a separate board; just adds complexity to the whole thing.