High resistance cable problem

(Arduino) ------------>(0.5 ohm cable)------------->(Sensor ) **No problem, read sensor

but;

(Arduino) ------------>(10 Mega Ohm cable)------------->(Sensor ) *!*This problem, cant read

Hi guys, how can i read sensor with 10mega ohm cable. thanks…

what do you mean by "10Mega Ohm cable" ? Such a cable wouldn't be a cable, it would be a piece of wood ;-)

if the cable on the picture is the one you're talking about, then it is broken inside ! or did you make the measure between the "signal" part (the inner wire) and the "gnd" part , wich is at least 10MOhm ? But the resistance between the two extremities of the same wire won't be 10MOhm unless it is broken.

what are you trying to measure ? which sensor is it ?

That looks like a wrist (or leg)-stat cable. A wrist-stat is worn when working with static sensitive devices or materials. The resistance in the cable is meant to dissipate (bleed off) the static charge in a way that will not allow a spark, hence the high resistance. Why are you using that cable?

alnath: what do you mean by "10Mega Ohm cable" ? Such a cable wouldn't be a cable, it would be a piece of wood ;-)

if the cable on the picture is the one you're talking about, then it is broken inside ! or did you make the measure between the "signal" part (the inner wire) and the "gnd" part , wich is at least 10MOhm ? But the resistance between the two extremities of the same wire won't be 10MOhm unless it is broken.

what are you trying to measure ? which sensor is it ?

Ahahaha yes big father, this is wood :) My cable Anti-Static Wrist Band. i cant read sensor now

There’s almost no sensor I can imagine that could function at the end of a 10M connection!! But
you never said what sensor anyway, which is kind of important to know.

alnath asked

what are you trying to measure ? which sensor is it ?

And I will add, why that cable?

You need to answer the questions asked if you want help.

groundfungus: That looks like a wrist (or leg)-stat cable. A wrist-stat is worn when working with static sensitive devices or materials. The resistance in the cable is meant to dissipate the static charge in a way that will not allow a spark, hence the high resistance. Why are you using that cable?

Hi groundfungus; this is true i using this cable because i read, human wristband attached or not attached. And using Capacitive Sensing Library.

and @MarkT thank you for answers;

But sensor dont important, maybe temperature sensor maybe , button int doesnt matter. but im using read human capasitive okayy thank you

this is true i using this cable because i read, human wristband attached or not attached. And using Capacitive Sensing Library.

I don't really understand what you're trying to do, but capacitive-touch might not work with a high-resistance ground strap.... Maybe you've found out that it doesn't work...

But sensor dont important, maybe temperature sensor maybe , button int doesnt matter. but im using read human capasitive okayy thank you

It might matter.... ;)

The way to test a wrist strap is to make a [u]voltage divider[/u] where the "bottom" resistor is the wrist strap and your body in series, and the "top" resistor is equal to, or greater than, the wrist strap & body resistance. Then you need a capacitor filter to filter-out the noise picked-up by your body.

BTW - My wrist strap measures 1M and I'm measuring about 5M (highly variable) with a meter-probe in each hand. With the wrist strap in series, the resistance was too high for my meter to measure, until I put some water on my wrist for better contact.

TeslaArduino: Hi groundfungus; this is true i using this cable because i read, human wristband attached or not attached. And using Capacitive Sensing Library.

and @MarkT thank you for answers;

But sensor dont important, maybe temperature sensor maybe , button int doesnt matter. but im using read human capasitive okayy thank you

Don't use a 10 Meg cable. Get one that doesn't have a resistor built into it, otherwise it's like trying to watch a movie through a blackout curtain.

That's really the only answer you're going to get.

Thank you all. i cant use 10mohm cable and im right now

Sure you can!

With a high enough voltage, you can force any desired amount of current through the cable.

Use 10 V for every microampere you need.

jremington: Sure you can!

With a high enough voltage, you can force any desired amount of current through the cable.

Use 10 V for every microampere you need.

At least until it fries, arcs over, kills someone, and burns down your house. That might violate some noise ordinance or something in your city and cause you to get fined.

jremington: Sure you can!

With a high enough voltage, you can force any desired amount of current through the cable.

Use 10 V for every microampere you need.

Hi jremington; thank you for answers. can u share circuit? i don't understand. and is it dangerous?

is it dangerous?

Could be, if you use a high enough voltage.

current = voltage/resistance (Ohm's law).

TeslaArduino: Hi jremington; thank you for answers. can u share circuit? i don't understand. and is it dangerous?

Yes it is dangerous. Don't take his joke seriously.