Hold power on a DC motor to maintain position?

I'm using two of this motor controller to run two actuators on my Shelby for an active aero wing.

When I set both analog motor direction inputs low / off, the wind force above 130mph can drive the actuators off position. Can I give a low power value to both extend / retract inputs to power the motor and cause it to hold position, or will that burn up the motor or the controller?

TY!

You can’t hold a motor stalled unless it is specifically designed to be so .

You need something like a worm drive gearbox
Not sure what your application is here , but if it’s model aircraft the design of aero sections can be made to reduce the operating force required “balanced”

hammy:
You can’t hold a motor stalled unless it is specifically designed to be so .

You need something like a worm drive gearbox
Not sure what your application is here , but if it’s model aircraft the design of aero sections can be made to reduce the operating force required “balanced”

Thanks for the info. It's on a track car - here's a demo.
https://www.instagram.com/p/CJbe4APgq5u/

I guess I'll have to monitor the position and drive it back in place when needed. I wonder if I set the analog value to something extremely low when above 130mph, if it would keep the motor powered enough to offset the wind force.

fordfanboi:
I'm using two of this motor controller to run two actuators on my Shelby for an active aero wing.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00WSN98DC

When I set both analog motor direction inputs low / off, the wind force above 130mph can drive the actuators off position. Can I give a low power value to both extend / retract inputs to power the motor and cause it to hold position, or will that burn up the motor or the controller?

TY!

You can easily test this by doing it and use your hand on the motor. If the motor gets too hot for you to hold, then you are at the point where the motor will be damaged. As far as the controller, if it is properly designed and air can freely move around the controller and you are operating within it's design limits, then if will be ok.
Paul

Paul_KD7HB:
You can easily test this by doing it and use your hand on the motor. If the motor gets too hot for you to hold, then you are at the point where the motor will be damaged. As far as the controller, if it is properly designed and air can freely move around the controller and you are operating within it's design limits, then if will be ok.
Paul

Thanks Paul, I'll give it a shot. The controller has a big heat sink but it has never been warm since I only run one direction at a time. I suspect this may be what it's for.

if your motor has an encoder you could use a motion controller card to hold a position.
https://www.dimensionengineering.com/products/kangaroo

DC motors by themselves don’t do position control. They produce a torque proportional to the
current (less the friction torque loss), and the current depends on the applied voltage, back EMF
and winding resistance.

A non-back-drivable actuator would solve your problem (ie suitable gearing), otherwise you’ll
need an encoder to sense position and feedback loop to correct it.

Have you considered a hydraulic system using the engine oil pressure as a power source and controlling that to a hydraulic cylinder to move the wing?
Paul

You can still balance an aerofoil on a car by having the pivot point a way back from the front . The force on the front part then balances the force on the rear part , reducing the load on your actuator .

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