Home physics lab with Arduino - how/where to start?

I'd like to use arduino to initiate a small home scientific lab for children in my family.

I'd like to start with a mass going down an incline with a start-stop digital clock, and then continue with experiments involving temperature, pression, electromagnetism.

I found the site www.manylabs.com, it looks perfect, but alas it does not ship its kits to Europe.

These items would have been perfect for me:
http://store.manylabs.org/products/k0906
http://store.manylabs.org/collections/kits/products/k0001

Can anyone tell me whether some companies sell such kits in Italy/Europe?
In any case, I'd appreciate some pointers on how to start working with Arduino going in that direction.

Thank you for your attention.

yourduino has some kits that might be interesting and Terry King (owner) is sometimes here on the forum and is definitely willing to think with you. I have mailed him.

Hello Muzietto,

(And thanks to Rob for the pointer!)

I am interested in possibly collaborating on this and what you need.

I am currently redesigning the "Electronic Brick Starter Set" product I sell, to use newer available "bricks" and our new YourDuino RoboRED (See HERE: Also trying to lower cost..

The kit will contain something near the functions you can see HERE:

This is aimed a exploring Arduino, Electronics, Sensors etc. But much of it can be used in Science experiments.

About Motion Sensing: I am interested in adding components to the kit for sensing motion and doing timing, and probably including Stroboscope capability (High-Power White LEDs are now available that work for this).

Motion Sensors might be THIS One:

Years ago I did a lot with IBM PC and this physics / motion stuff.

Let me know what you think and I will be back later with more info..

I'd like to start with a mass going down an incline with a start-stop digital clock, and then continue with experiments involving temperature, pression, electromagnetism.

I think that's great and I hope your children find this stuff interesting. When I was young I enjoyed playing around with electricity, and to me physics is the most fun & interesting science because things move and you can actually see what's going on... At least with basic (Newtonian?) physics.

But... Microcontrollers and physics are two different subjects. And, programming is a 3rd subject.

You might study some basic circuits and electromagnetism in a physics class but if you were taking electronics at a university you wouldn't study microcontrollers until the 3rd or 4th year.

On the other hand, digital electronics is "easy". The signals are either on or off and hobbyists do jump-in with the Arduino and do fun or useful things with LEDs, relays, motors, etc., without understanding much about basic electronics.

if you were taking electronics at a university you wouldn't study microcontrollers until the 3rd or 4th year

I'm HAPPY to say that was true when I went to University (the first time, 50+ years ago), BUT

Not Any More. I have sold 2000+ of THIS: kit to Universities where Engineering and Computer SCience Freshmen are openign that box and connecting stuff and writing MicroController Code the 2nd or 3rd week of class.

SO it took 55 years for me to get my revenge :slight_smile:

When I was 10 or 11 years old I knew the Old Man, A.C. Gilbert, who patented the Erector Set 100 Years ago. My friend's father was the sales manager of the A.C.Gilbert company. On Sundays the Old Man was puttering around the factory. He would reach in a parts bin, pull something out to show us. "Hey Kid, What's THAT?" he would say. He gave us PARTS, and we built all kinds of stuff like American Flyer Train truck sections that went like Hell on the track my friend Mark and I made in his room.

So now I am very happy to be building The ErectorArduino Set of 2014!

I just wish I had understood and appreciated the Old Man when he was still alive.