how can I increase output voltage depend on input voltage.

I am a newbie to Arduino. I would like to request you to help me out.

Can I use configure an Arduino Uno or nano to output a voltage signal that's based on but not equal to an input voltage signal?

For example, I'll have a sensor that sends the Arduino a signal somewhere between o.1v to 1v volts. Let's say it's 0.5v volts right now. At the moment the input is 0.5v volts, I want it to send an output voltage of say 0.6v volts. I'll need to do this over an entire range i.e. sometimes .7 volts, will come in and I'll need to send out .8v or whatever, but all in that 0.1 to 1 volt range.

Thank You.

An Arduino such as an Uno or Mega can measure voltages in the range 0 to 5v but it cannot directly produce a varying output voltage.

It can produce PWM output with the analogWrite() command which can be proportional to the measured voltage but the PWM signal is a succession of 5v pulses with the percentage of time at 5v varying from 0% to 100%. You will need an external circuit to convert that to a varying voltage.

I believe some of the Arduinos with higher-performance processors have Digital To Analog converters which would produce a varying voltage, but (I assume) the output will be in the range 0 to 3.3v as they use 3.3v microprocessors.

You can also buy external DACs that could probably be interfaced to any Arduino. If you can get one that works at the output voltages that you require it may be the best solution. Browse the catalogue of one of the big component suppliers such as RS Components or DigiKey.

...R

A PWM signal can be run through a RC low pass filter to provide a somewhat flat DC voltage. That's the easiest and cheapest solution.

External DAC typically have their own output voltage supply, separate from the logic supply. And for output voltages up to 1V any supply will do :slight_smile:

The Uno and Nano don't have analogue outputs. The best you can achieve is a PWM output with a RC network. Alternatively you can use an external DAC. this was all mentioned above.

The calculations can be done with relative ease.

What is the entire range? It might be possible to do that with an opamp and add the 0.1V offset; this is outside my area of expertise.

Maybe... :slight_smile:

Maybe.jpg

Maybe.jpg

sterretje:
The Uno and Nano don't have analogue outputs. The best you can achieve is a PWM output with a RC network. Alternatively you can use an external DAC. this was all mentioned above.

The calculations can be done with relative ease.

What is the entire range? It might be possible to do that with an opamp and add the 0.1V offset; this is outside my area of expertise.

Dear, can I have an example by opamp and how does you do 0.1v offset...

bluejets:
Maybe... :slight_smile:

Maybe.jpg

Dear, what does the circuit is called????
can you please make an example by this circuit. ?

Do a search for opamp summing amplifier. Result e.g. https://www.electronics-tutorials.ws/opamp/opamp_4.html. You're probably mostly interested in the Non-inverting Summing Amplifier.

This is called an "XY problem".

If you explain what it is you are actually trying to do, where this input voltage comes from and for what purpose you presume to use the output voltage, and specify what each of the input and output devices are, we can probably provide a proper solution.