How can I use the 5V pin for many sensors?

Hi,

I’m having an issue. I want to have your advice to deal with it. I want to connect 2 others sensors and 2 other servos to the 5V pin. However, my motorshield is already plugged in it.
I’m thinking about soldering the other wires with the pin of the motorshield but I’m not sure it’s a great idea. I also linked a picture in the description! (It my old motorshield, I got a new one cause the old one was defective and my solders are actually made well this time!

Thank you guys!
Max.

Basically either solder wires onto the line or get another shield with feed through connectors.

However driving a servo and other motors ( you don't need a motor shield for a servo ) from the 5V line is a bad idea because they take more current than this line can supply.

I use little pieces of stripboard or solderable breadboard/protoboard with 0.1" pin header in it to split up the power rail into little ones (hey, I just so happen to sell a lot of board just like that and bigger ones too )

In that case, with that "shield", I think the only way you're going to get onto the 5v is by soldering wires to that shield (or the back of your uno >.> ). You can also solder little pieces of protoboard right onto the bottoms of a row of pin header - but probably just better off with a wire running to a scrap of PCB where you split it up.

This is something that annoys me about a lot of microcontroller development boards. They never give you enough Vcc or enough ground pins to connect all the stuff you want to - so great, their board is super tiny... but you need a rats nest of wire or another scrap of pcb to split the power and ground up to connect more than one thing to it, and all of a sudden it's not so tiny anymore, and it's ugly too.

Grumpy_Mike: Basically either solder wires onto the line or get another shield with feed through connectors.

However driving a servo and other motors ( you don't need a motor shield for a servo ) from the 5V line is a bad idea because they take more current than this line can supply.

I'm only thinking about powering 2 servos and 2 wheel encoders with it! It should be find I hope.

DrAzzy: I use little pieces of stripboard or solderable breadboard/protoboard with 0.1" pin header in it to split up the power rail into little ones (hey, I just so happen to sell a lot of board just like that and bigger ones too )

In that case, with that "shield", I think the only way you're going to get onto the 5v is by soldering wires to that shield (or the back of your uno >.> ). You can also solder little pieces of protoboard right onto the bottoms of a row of pin header - but probably just better off with a wire running to a scrap of PCB where you split it up.

This is something that annoys me about a lot of microcontroller development boards. They never give you enough Vcc or enough ground pins to connect all the stuff you want to - so great, their board is super tiny... but you need a rats nest of wire or another scrap of pcb to split the power and ground up to connect more than one thing to it, and all of a sudden it's not so tiny anymore, and it's ugly too.

I think you're right, I'm gonna solder one wire that will power a small pcb plate like you showed me. Or I might just use my breadboard. I kinda agree with your point. I was suprised when I realized arduino has only one 5V pin.

By the way, what is the current max for the 5V pin? I can't get to find the same answer on the web. I'm powering the arduino throw the VPIN with 6V if that can help. I just want to be sure that my servos don't burn my arduino.

Thank you for your answers!

Guys I got what SEEMS to be a great idea! What if I put an digital PIN to HIGH always? I should always get 5V from it right? I don't wanna try to power my encoders (that's my actual step right now in the project) before you can confirm me that this is a good idea, I don't want to burn my board by mistake.

Thank you!

Two servo's is two to many, they can peak at an amp a piece.

6V is not enough to correctly power the regulator if you feed it into the Vin pin.

Once the current from a pin gets to be 40mA your pin starts to fry.

Why do you want a motor shield? You do not need one to drive a servo.

Grumpy_Mike:
Two servo’s is two to many, they can peak at an amp a piece.

6V is not enough to correctly power the regulator if you feed it into the Vin pin.

Once the current from a pin gets to be 40mA your pin starts to fry.

Why do you want a motor shield? You do not need one to drive a servo.

I have the motorshield for my already working two DC motors. However right now I have to add two encoders and at least two servos next mounth maybe.

So you’re telling me that I can’t plug my servos with it. However, why are you asking me why I take a motorshield if I can’t anyway plug my servos in the arduino cause it’ll fry it.

My wheel encoders should be fin with 40mA? What do you think?

MaxiMax07: why are you asking me why I take a motorshield if I can't anyway plug my servos in the arduino cause it'll fry it.

I think you're confusing powering a servo with controlling a servo. You should never power a servo (its red wire) from an Arduino, but can always control one (the white or yellow or orange wire) from an Arduino

MaxiMax07: My wheel encoders should be fin with 40mA? What do you think?

I think you should look at the data sheet or measure the current.

Why have you got two threads running asking the same question? http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=379191.new#new

I have the motorshield for my already working two DC motors. However right now I have to add two encoders and at least two servos next mounth maybe.

So not only do you want to power two DC motors you also want to ADD two servos? You did not make that clear in the words you used.

My wheel encoders should be fin with 40mA? What do you think?

That using a digital pin to power that is just silly, there is no point. The power has to come from somewhere and at the moment it is all the same place. Using a digital pin just passes the power through the chip first, so it saves you nothing plus puts extra strain on the chip.

JimboZA: I think you're confusing powering a servo with controlling a servo. You should never power a servo (its red wire) from an Arduino, but can always control one (the white or yellow or orange wire) from an Arduino

I think you should look at the data sheet or measure the current.

Yeah I tought they were working as the DC motors. It's good to know thank you! It's one thing I don't have to worry about anymore.

I will also mesure it tomorrow! I'll remove the motorshield, try out the encoder and test the current. I couldn't find any data sheet. However most encoders seems to need a supply arround 10 mA so I should be good.

Grumpy_Mike: Why have you got two threads running asking the same question? http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=379191.new#new

So not only do you want to power two DC motors you also want to ADD two servos? You did not make that clear in the words you used. That using a digital pin to power that is just silly, there is no point. The power has to come from somewhere and at the moment it is all the same place. Using a digital pin just passes the power through the chip first, so it saves you nothing plus puts extra strain on the chip.

It's not at all the same post. I asked one week ago how to power the arduino because I only have 4AA battery. Now I asked how to use a 5V pin if its already taken (as shown by the picture) by the motorshield, to power my encoders and my servos. Then I tought maybe I could be able to use the digital pin as a power supply because my battery voltage is to high for my encoder and trying to add two wires in my solders of my motorshield seems a bit sketchy.