How did we get to know all this sh*t?

I've just been making some comments about a servo problem when it occurred to wonder when, where or why did I learn all that stuff, or any of the other bits and pieces of stuff that I know.

I never took a formal course in it, and I suspect, even for folk who did take a formal engineering or computer science course, very little of the useful info that they hand out here was learned in that formal environment.

...R

You live long enough, work widely, you pick up stuff.

Let's see - telecoms (telex to cellular), test gear, graphics (early VR), image processing (tomography, weapons guidance, machine vision), radar, electromechanical devices.

And then there's all the stuff that those things are applied to, or use use as ancillary technologies.

And that's just the stuff that pays the bills, before we get on to the things I'm interested in...

Robin2:
I've just been making some comments about a servo problem when it occurred to wonder when, where or why did I learn all that stuff, or any of the other bits and pieces of stuff that I know.

I never took a formal course in it, and I suspect, even for folk who did take a formal engineering or computer science course, very little of the useful info that they hand out here was learned in that formal environment.

...R

I'd be guessing, but you probably got all that knowledge from reading Arduino forum posts.

Paul

Paul_KD7HB:
I'd be guessing, but you probably got all that knowledge from reading Arduino forum posts.

Paul

That's only part of it.

But do you not find it wonderful and amazing how you acquired and remember all the stuff you use to help people?

...R

You only have 100,000,000 read cycles before things become iffy ~66 years. :frowning:

But yes, often thought the human body/brain is miraculous!

Robin2:
That's only part of it.

But do you not find it wonderful and amazing how you acquired and remember all the stuff you use to help people?

...R

I find most of the time I try to help people is because the answers are "logical". I am surprised at how many posts on the forums have a logical problem. Many times because no research leaves big gaps in the path from problem to solution.

I still remember stuff that never happened!

Paul

larryd:
You only have 100,000,000 read cycles before things become iffy ~66 years. :frowning:
...

Wait ... what!!!???

My birthday is next week - and it's the big six six. Are you telling me it's gonna start going downhill? Perhaps I should go back to Edison member!

On top of the hill going down the other side:
Yes, watching Star Trek episodes for the 200th time, dropping food on your shirt when eating, drooling, anal leakage (Depends), the golden years takes all your gold.
However, you won’t be aware of what’s happening :wink: .

Conrgats Chris!

52 was a very good year :slight_smile:

I'm not losing my hair, it's just migrating from my head to other places...nostrils, ears, eyebrows, etc.

I didn't hang around in bars, much, or out on corners when I was young. That probably helped with learning.

I don't watch much TV either, there's so much brain rot TV teaching always to follow, obey and consume whatcher told.
I am way too skeptical to be happy with most TV, I don't want to shut off and start eating what I smell.

We all feel normal and wonder why so many others seem slow. It's because we're not.

And possibly some people have good long term memory while others can't seem to remember last year.

larryd:
On top of the hill going down the other side:
Yes, watching Star Trek episodes for the 200th time, dropping food on your shirt when eating, drooling, anal leakage (Depends), the golden years takes all your gold.
However, you won’t be aware of what’s happening :wink: .

Conrgats Chris!

52 was a very good year :slight_smile:

So was 56, each time I leave the house I make sure I have one of these in my top pocket and it has stuff written on it that I “might” forget.
56042__11445.1524053938.1280.1280.jpg
Its also a great excuse when asked didn’t you buy this or that when out “hunter gathering” at the supermarket.
All I say “If it wasn’t on the list, I didn’t buy it”
My point, I’m getting old and don’t want to waste what ever brain power I have left, being a mind reader.

Tom… :slight_smile:

TomGeorge:
So was 56, each time I leave the house I make sure I have one of these in my top pocket and it has stuff written on it that I “might” forget.
56042__11445.1524053938.1280.1280.jpg
Its also a great excuse when asked didn’t you buy this or that when out “hunter gathering” at the supermarket.
All I say “If it wasn’t on the list, I didn’t buy it”
My point, I’m getting old and don’t want to waste what ever brain power I have left, being a mind reader.

Tom… :slight_smile:

I am a firm believer of the grocery list! Of course, I will always add for my whims.

I quit keeping notes when I kept losing the things along with the time it took to write it all down.
I see people do that with phones now, was PDA's long ago.

I rely on several padfolios laying around the house. :confused:

2018-12-17_10-28-41.jpg

Robin2:
I've just been making some comments about a servo problem when it occurred to wonder when, where or why did I learn all that stuff, or any of the other bits and pieces of stuff that I know.

I can almost understand knowing technical stuff. What blows my mind is to be watching Jeopardy and Trebek rattles off some supremely obscure factoid and as he's reading it I. Don't. Have A. Clue. A few milliseconds later an answer pops into consciousness and I'm amazed how often it's correct. Or, at least close.

And I wonder, where did that come from? How in the world did I know that?? Now, what my wife asked me to do five minutes ago - that's another matter. :grin:

How about waking up at 3 AM and you get that eureka moment. :sleeping:

larryd:
How about waking up at 3 AM and you get that eureka moment. :sleeping:

Yes an epiphany.

larryd:
How about waking up at 3 AM and you get that eureka moment. :sleeping:

Yeah. That can be a very creative time.

...R

That's why I started out with a pad and pen on a table next to my bed.
And then I got my own computer. Yes, I debugged code in my sleep.

I worked late on code in 2 places where I'd let myself out at night. After mentioning figuring the bug out by the time I got to my car, I got keys to get back in.

James Burke made a series named The Real Thing in 1980. There's a copy from videotape on Youtube, it's about human brain workings and development as a mystery in 6 parts. By the end of part 5, the brain shouldn't work and then comes part 6 and ba-boom the mystery is solved in a way that the watcher can grow on.
One biggie for me was finding that humans have modes, we can see ourselves as finite state machines. Oh joy, where's the editor?
The first two episodes have some bad spots but it's the content that matters or just don't bother and tune in to something sparkely keen.

Who else is up to watching a mildly entertaining 4 hour series to learn about themselves and others? (sound of crickets)

I love that different humans are interested in different things and remember arcane details about their specialization. For some, the private lives of movie stars are really important and they can speak for hours on who is going out with whom.

Like most of the regulars here, I have a good memory for technical stuff. But I am in awe of those who remember part numbers. A friend of mine often comes out with things like "Ahhhh! The 7508! I used to use them a lot in the 90s. Make sure you keep the ..." Me? I can't remember the name of the IMU chip I put on a breadboard last week and I have been programming on it all week.