How do I amplify an IR Sensor ?

Hi,
i’m making a Sumo Robot and a Micromouse Robot, and i decided to choose IR Sensor ( TCRT5000 i.e ) to detect obstacles and opponent robot
i need to get Readings from the IR Sensor at long distance say 1 meter
what’s the best method may i use ?
thanks in advance .

Here's one tutorial

This video is also helpful

However I think THIS one is probably going to be the easiest starting point.

raschemmel:
Here's one tutorial

This video is also helpful

However I think THIS one is probably going to be the easiest starting point.

Thanks for your help ..
but this method can provide maximum range at 5 cm only ..!
i need to increase my reading range so i can use it in my purpose .. thanks again .

You can use the instrumentation amp circuit on page 1 of the LT1215 oo amp datasheet.

Those are just not meant for what you want to do. There for close range only. If you look at the charts you'll see that theres a honey spot and even if you make the led brighter or amply the output you'll not gain anything really.
You'll make it pickup say 3 feet objects but you can't tell if its one and half foot or 3.
The chart shows a peak at a little over 2 mm but 1 mm and 5 mm are the same.
So you just change the honey spot.
To give a range would be very hard to do.

Although not designed for long distance, it seems possible as it has a wide bandwidth photo-transistor and daylight filter. I would start by getting 1 small flat black tube about 1 inch long (could be 1 piece of heat-shrink tubing) and fit the tubing over the photo-transistor. This will make the sensor more directional, but much more capable of sensing long distance.

Aim the sensor module at a dark object 1 meter away. Using the circuit below, try different values for R2 so that your A0 reading is somewhere between 100 and 200. I suspect R2 would be some value between 1MΩ and 100KΩ.

Now when a light coloured or reflective object 1 meter away is sensed, the value at A0 should increase.
(completely untested, but might be worth trying).

I would start by getting 1 small flat black tube about 1 inch long (could be 1 piece of heat-shrink tubing) and fit the tubing over the photo-transistor. This will make the sensor more directional, but much more capable of sensing long distance.

All the online DIY versions use drinking straws painted black and taped or glued together. Hot glue works with paper straws but melts plastic straws.Tube length is 1/4" to 1/2" . I think any longer than that doesn't work well because it hinders reflection.

If you put a non-inverting

op amp amplifier between the collector and A0 analog input, you can increase the sensitivity.

It don’t matter what you do it’s never going to be better then the part it’s self. Yes you can make it read 3 meters but it’s not going to give u good readings from say 1 meter to 3 meter

FYI,
It's on page-4/Fig. 9
datasheet

It don't matter what you do it's never going to be better then the part it's self. Yes you can make it read 3 meters but it's not going to give u good readings from say 1 meter to 3 meter

The part itself has quite an impressive bandwidth. With typical collector dark current of 10nA and collector current of 1mA with IF 10mA @ 12mm, that's 5 orders of magnitude for sensitivity to light. With IF = 50mA, could get 7mA collector current which is a light/dark ratio of 700,000.

Could use extra pins with series resistors to set range , i.e. 1MΩ, 510K, 240K, 220K, 110K, 56K for 64 ranges (6-bit) just by setting variations of output high or input.

Just some ideas ... all untested with this part. However, I have used the OP293A and OP805SL in a totally different application and achieved a range of 1 cm to 4 meters.

If you want to increase he range i think you need a more powerful light source.
Straws may help but optics would be better.

The Op needs something like a sharp range finder which is made for what he wants what he has is mad to see if there paper in the printer it knows something is sitting 2.5 mm if you start and move into something yes it would no.
But if that object moves away it get's the same reading. This is good reading to help you make a better mouse trap.
range finder

I agree. It’s a poor choice of a sensor for the application. The sensor should be chosen for the application , not chosen arbitrarily and then commissioned for some completely different application. The cart is clearly before the horse. Establish your design criteria (sensor range)

i need to get Readings from the IR Sensor at long distance say 1 meter

and then choose a sensor made for that range (1 meter ) . Possibly a laser displacement sensor but it might be too large for your application. If you use a micro laser and a servo to adjust angle, and uC to calculate geometry it could work.
IsoscelesTriangle

^ <=(Servo pointed Laser)

|

--------- <=(Receiver|)

It all comes down to the application, in which "obstacle detection" was mentioned but measuring range was not.

Any method used for obstacle detection will have its advantages and disadvantages. Many variables to consider ... colour, reflectivity, distance, required field of view, optics and focus, etc. Perhaps more details by the OP could clarify.

I stand by my suggestion that this sensor could work well and also have some advantages over other methods ... specifically field of view, high sensitivity and low cost. To demonstrate the viewable area at 1 meter, could take a small super-bright led flashlight with 1" flat black tube fitted over the led, then aim at target at 1 meter. Could adjust the viewing shape and/or area by changing the opening of the tube with slot, square or other shape. Of course, could just view the IR pattern with a digital camera.

1 meter could be seen i didn't say it can't im saying that to do so with what he has is not going to be done easy it was made for things way closer lol the sharp ir stuff is a lot better at things 3 feet away.
To make what he has work would need code to determine what it picks up plus a opamp
Plus push the power to the ir to the limit. And some more stuff.

Ahh yes, not easy, lots of R&D, trial & error, some extra components and op-amp would be very beneficial +1. At least the MCU will help keep the hardware to a minimal circuit. Also, I agree there are better products out there. With that in mind, experimenting with the existing sensor could at least be a great learning experience and help identify features that are needed or not needed.

Note you're driving the IR source with dc.

IR Devices with a reasonable range modulate the drive LED with a high frequency, and the detector
electronics is tuned to that frequency.

This gives you

1/considerable immunity to ambient light
2/ much greater range.

Worth a try?

regards

Allan.