How do you make Atemega168 standalone???

I’m sure this have been discussed here before so if someone could provide me the link that would be cool. I just want to know what the bare things I need to run the mega168. I’m using the arduino board to program it but then want to place the mega 168 in a breadboard or perf board to make things smaller so I don’t have to keep removing my arduino from my projects. Thanks a bunch.

Google Says:

site:arduino.cc arduino standalone

Links I’ve found useful:

http://www.arduino.cc/playground/Learning/AtmegaStandalone
http://www.arduino.cc/en/Main/StandaloneAssembly
http://www.imagearts.ryerson.ca/sdaniels/physcomp/tutorials/Arduino_standalone/ard_hack.html
http://www.arduino.cc/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl?num=1234192721
http://www.arduino.cc/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl?num=1239733868
http://www.arduino.cc/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl?num=1240701133
http://www.arduino.cc/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl?num=1239733868

Yes I have been googling, thats why I came here cause I had came across several different way, but alot of them are also just making a barebone arduino. But I came across some stuff wanted to know if this seem to be the right stuff I need and if its possible to run it with much less.

22pf Capacitors (2x)
16 MHz Crystal (1x)
Tact Switch (1x)
10k Resistor (1x)
1K Resistor(1x)

Ok just seen one of your site listed there have pretty the same parts I just listed. So my second question would be do I have to have a 5v regulator. The arduino can run off of 9v so didn’t know if I could do the same with the mega168 standalone or if I would have to have the 5v regulator. I’m planning on having sensor, servos, and other stuff connected but will have most with there own power supply.

5vdc is the voltage requirement for the 168 when running at clock speed of 16mhz. It can be somewhat less if running slower clock speed, but never 12vdc directly.

Lefty

Other’s have also mentioned that it is possible to run the 168 without a crystal+caps/resonator if you burn the Lilypad bootloader, and are ok running on the internal 8MHz clock.

Boarduino’s aren’t that expensive if you just buy the PCB and populate it yourself.

I would just use the boarduino as a base to build from and treat it like a “chip” when doing a PCB… like this:

This way you can treat the Arduino like a small daughter board in a larger circuit.