How do you store your projects during development?

So I have so many crazy ideas, many already exist, but rather do them myself.
So I bought a whole bunch of uno boards(clones) for $5 each anytime I would go to the store.

Now I have about 4 setup for different things as my module and components come in, so I was wondering what everyone uses or does to keep their project separated?

I saw somewhere, not sure if it was on twitter or just google search, but some use the cheap Tupperware containers to keep everything together and stackable, which also allows for labling of the project.

Is this the easiest or cheapest way others have stored the projects? I mean unless I have the modules connected to the boards and bread boards, I wouldn't know what the project was, so at the moment im leaving everything all breadboarded together and in plastic bags to take to work and home so I can work on them as I can. But a plastic bag is not the safest way to carry as connections and components can come loose or damaged.

Just looking for suggestions.

thanks.

I don't keep projects on solderless breadboards long term.
Once working, I either build it up using wirewrap sockets, or I make a PCB.


Nice thing about wirewrap is that's durable and can be moved around without wires falling off. If you want to make a change you can just unwrap the wire and add a new one. If you want to add more to the circuit you can just tack down another socket, or socket strip, and add away.
And if you want, you can remove all the wires and put on new chip and wire it up as something totally different.

I prefer building up on Island of Holes perfboard, Velleman ECS 1/2
http://www.vellemanusa.com/products/view/?country=us&lang=enu&id=350322
makes the best, nice evenly spaced holes, quality copper, very easy to put sockets in.
Good source for sockets, wire, wirewrap tool (30 AWG wire).
http://www.king-cart.com/phoenixent/category=SOCKETS+WIRE+WRAP+DIP+%2526+SIP

Huh, well, those should have opened up as the attached pictures.

So is wirewrap a type of wire? or is that just another form of wire loom?

The pics don't show up, so was viewing the links and googling the suggestions.

Wirewrap is just 30 AWG wire with insulation. You strip off 1/2" or so, insert it into the tool, and twist it onto the socket leg (LED legs too). No soldering needed. When I was in college, I epoxied sockets onto bare perfboard. Now I just solder down a couple of the legs instead. Much less messy. Can sit in front of the TV and wire stuff up, yellow highlight lines on the schematic as you go to keep track of what's done. Use a simple color scheme if you want - red for power, black for ground, another color or two for signals.

You can click the attached pictures and they open ok, yes?

Here is analog guru Jim Williams style (rest his soul in peace):

http://www.reallyusefulproducts.co.uk/uk/html/onlineshop/rub/b00_35litre.php

Office Depot has them.

1/4" plywood + industrial strength velcro - Google Search

https://www.google.com/search?q=7J76+24+cup

Work great for general storage. I get them at Target (price and convenience).

I use these:
https://www.homedepot.ca/en/home/p.dewalt-deep-pro-organizer-2pk.1000683867.html

2016-01-14_13-39-50.png

.

I like Really Useful Boxes also. Put some antistatic bubble wrap in the bottom for cushioning and to help with ESD.

jremington:
Here is analog guru Jim Williams style (rest his soul in peace):

Man, if only I could be so organized.

I already have 7 or 8 of the organizers, but those I use to keep the individual components separated and labeled. I think that the Tupperware method is the way to go for storage of work in progress setups and transportation of said project.

The plastic bag is not very good transporation or storage option, but does the job so far, I def want to be able to store the project, labeled and all together and be able to come back to it and recall what I was doing.

Attached is how I carry each project to work and home, and bringing 3 or 4 up to work is not so easy when im trying to be gentle so that any of the small components don’t get damaged.

20160114_154001_resized.jpg

Watch out with plastic bags like ziplocks or whatever. ESD can kill your components.

I try to work on one project at a time, and as soon as it is finished I move it to a protoboard.

When it is something I won't work on for a long time (waiting for funds or something) I put it on a protoboard as well, since they are not too expensive and I can use sockets for my IC's so they can still be exchanged.

When something is final (which happened like once or twice in the course of 6 years) I'll built it into something more permanent.

I don't have a load of Arduino's and breadboards (some of it is underway) so I have to make due with what I do have.

I would NEVER store a project in any plastic container that does not have an ESD safe logo on it. Things are usually in a little wooden box I have, and then still covered with ESD safe foam.

So I have so many crazy ideas, many already exist, but rather do them myself.
So I bought a whole bunch of uno boards(clones) for $5 each anytime I would go to the store.

Now I have about 4 setup for different things as my module and components come in, so I was wondering what everyone uses or does to keep their project separated?

You need to work on your ADD, and try to stick to one project at at time, until it's done. :wink:

Usually, I'm working on the box/enclosure and power supply fairly early in the project (usually after I've done some experimenting that I know what it's going to take). And most of the time, I build permanently on a plug-in breadboard.

LarryD:
I use these:
https://www.homedepot.ca/en/home/p.dewalt-deep-pro-organizer-2pk.1000683867.html

2016-01-14_13-39-50.png

.

I have something like this that I use when I need to move operation somewhere, like if I go to my parent’s place for the weekend or something, but I honestly don’t like it much. I mostly just stock it with the common things I think I’ll need if I’m going away, and then throw in what projects I’m working on in the process.

I store projects in progress on the top of my parts drawers often, and on a side-table I have. When the project reaches a point where it’s no longer useful (ie, it’s been dropped or replaced), I throw it into either one of the 18x3x3 parts drawers (if it’s small) marked “electronics, misc” or the 18x10" cardboard bin (there are some nice fold-up bins that you put on shelves sold by graingers - that’s what I use) marked “Projects, for parts”, or if I think it’s real crap, I put it on the pile near the door that I try to get people to take stuff from when they come over. W

Basically, I have piles of projects on that table, and on top of the parts drawers. The key is that you need to have one clear work surface, with enough room for a project or two, and you must have your parts organized well. I use those little plastic drawers (the good ones from Akro Mills with the metal frames, bought used since they don’t make them anymore) - I’ve got 344 of the 6x3x1 drawers (or is it 8 inches deep), and many of them have dividers in them. I’ve found the little plastic containers meant for cosmetics (these: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00NJZ0I5U ) are great for small passives - I do that for things like LEDs and resistor networks, and crystals I don’t use often, things where the parts fit easily, but you need too damned many different kinds to fit them in drawers like you normally would.

What’s this about “finishing” projects though? I don’t understand?

What’s this about “finishing” projects though? I don’t understand?

It’s something people are compelled to do, or have OCD in doing. :wink:

Delta_G:
Man, if only I could be so organized.

jremington:
Here is analog guru Jim Williams style (rest his soul in peace):

So, organized ?
I wish I had that much hair !

speaking of taking it on the road,
wadda ya thing about these pencil irons ?
http://www.banggood.com/60W-220V-Electric-Adjustable-Temperature-Solder-Soldering-Iron-Tool-p-993252.html

no way I would pack my bench iron.

dave-in-nj:
speaking of taking it on the road,
wadda ya thing about these pencil irons ?
http://www.banggood.com/60W-220V-Electric-Adjustable-Temperature-Solder-Soldering-Iron-Tool-p-993252.html

no way I would pack my bench iron.

I always pack my bench iron (a magnetic weller).
It sits in a flight case with all the other soldering needs.

I hsve a similar case for test / leads including a psu.

Poor guy still has his badge on too.
Is that a gray Radio Shack multimeter on the small bench behind him?