How much voltage does an arduino amplify with additional amplifier circuit?

Hello,

My questions is "How much voltage can an Arduino amplify with additional amplifier circuit?"

Could we generate very high voltage (e.g. 1000 V) using analog or digital output from an Arduino?

If I add amplifier circuit to an analog output of Arduino to generate 1000 volts, is the max power 40 Watt (30 mA * 1000 V)? *current limit of Arduino is 40 mA/pin

Thank you.

  1. Yes, you could amplify an output signal to have 1000 volts amplitude.
  2. There is no particular limit on the power that an external amplifier could deliver, except as dictated by cost, size and other similar considerations.

If I add amplifier circuit to an analog output of Arduino to generate 1000 volts, is the max power 40 Watt (30 mA * 1000 V)? *current limit of Arduino is 40 mA/pin

No, the maximum power is limits only by the amplifier not by the input.

Note if you have to ask this then you do not have the skill to build an amplifier with a 1000V output. This sort of output can kill.

Grumpy_Mike:
No, the maximum power is limits only by the amplifier not by the input.

Note if you have to ask this then you do not have the skill to build an amplifier with a 1000V output. This sort of output can kill.

Thanks for the caution.

Ditto what Mike said.

Also, arduino does not have any analog outputs. All of the GPIO output digital signals. Arduino has PWM outputs which can be converted to analog uding an RC LPF. Its is better to just get a DAC if you need analog output.

Arduino GPIO are rated for 40 mA @ 5V => P = I*V = 0.040 A * 5V = 0.200 W (200 mW.)

I = P/V = 0.200 W/1000V= 0.0002 A (200 uA)

40W /1000V = 0.04 A (need 40W to get 40 mA @ 1000V. Gain is Vout/Vin

1000V/5V= 200

raschemmel: Ditto what Mike said.

Also, arduino does not have any analog outputs. All of the GPIO output digital signals. Arduino has PWM outputs which can be converted to analog uding an RC LPF. Its is better to just get a DAC if you need analog output.

Arduino GPIO are rated for 40 mA @ 5V => P = I*V = 0.040 A * 5V = 0.200 W (200 mW.)

I = P/V = 0.200 W/1000V= 0.0002 A (200 uA)

40W /1000V = 0.04 A (need 40W to get 40 mA @ 1000V. Gain is Vout/Vin

1000V/5V= 200

Thank you for reply.

Grumpy_Mike said that the maximum power is limited only by the amplifier not by the input.

But you are saying the 0.200 W.

Would you please resolve this confusion?

I guess, Grumpy_Mike considers external power for the amp circuit but you aren't. Is it right?

Remember that an amplifier has both a voltage gain and a current gain. Typically an amplifier will have a high impedance output so will have no input current requirement that is significant. Certainly nowhere near the limit of the Arduino pin.

, Grumpy_Mike considers external power for the amp circuit but you aren't.

Yes he is, you are misunderstanding what he put. He is giving you a sample calculation for the gain of the amplifier.

This sort of amplifier was used for the electrostatic deflection of CRTs ( Cathode Ray Tubes ) way back in the day. It is not just a matter of putting the components onto bread board. You need a proper layout respecting the gaps between conductors that a voltage of this type can jump. Note also you need a 1000V power supply, an amplifier does not conjure the output voltage from the input, it controls the voltage from a supply.

Grumpy_Mike: Remember that an amplifier has both a voltage gain and a current gain. Typically an amplifier will have a high impedance output

Typo: you meant high impedance input

Hi, What are you trying to do? What is the application that requires an Arduino to control 1000V?

Thanks.. Tom.. :)

Gain = Vout/Vin = 1000V/5V = 200 (CLEARLY this means VOLTAGE gain, NOT power gain. Do you see any mention of power here ?

As Mike said , amplifier input current will be small.

MarkT: Typo: you meant high impedance input

Yes I do thanks.

Thank you for all your comments.

Now, I understand that the current limit of an Arduino is not a issue because the current requirement of amp is very small, but spec of amp power supply is an issue.

TomGeorge: What is the application that requires an Arduino to control 1000V?

I am trying to control a MEMS scanner that requires less than 200 Vpp of sine or square wave signal (0-3 kHz frequency).

The 1000 V condition in this questions was for sufficient sample spec.

This is a piezo actuator? Why not explain this and show us the datasheet to start with?

hyunduk0206: Thanks for the caution.

He wasn't cautioning you to be careful, he was telling you not to do it.

When I was a kid I was pulling out one of those giant power bricks at an awkward angle. While it was still half in my finger just barely brushed the hot line and the muscle spasm felt like my arm exploded. Mains voltage in the US is 170 volts peak. 100 volts peak like what you're trying to do is still enough to knock you on your ass if you don't know what you're doing.

As Grumpy also said, the existence of this question is good evidence that you don't know what you're doing.

Mains voltage in the US is 170 volts peak. 100 volts peak like what you're trying to do is still enough to knock you on your ass

220/50 Hz will knock you on your ass will give you a "time out" (for about 5 minutes to "compose yourself")

raschemmel: 220/50 Hz will knock you on your ass will give you a "time out" (for about 5 minutes to "compose yourself")

Slightly OT, but the amount of people that are nominally in an electricity related profession that think 120V mains is more dangerous than 240V because "Durr, higher current dude!" is rather worrying.

Not even starting on the topic about whether AC or DC is more dangerous. I was actually asked that in my very first job interview. TL;DR of my answer: "I don't know. Every explanation that I have heard from people that do have an opinion (whichever they've believed) has sounded like nonsense. Until I can get a good explanation, I will believe that the voltage is more important than the hertz."

I got that job. :)

Thank you for saving my life.

I will not make an amp circuit on my own.

MarkT: This is a piezo actuator? Why not explain this and show us the datasheet to start with?

No, it is a kind of a sub-micro size electrostatic actuator.

I will do your suggestions by posting a new topic.

The answer is that since 120Vac is more than enough to kill you if you have a current path through the heart it makes no difference whether it is 120 or 220 since I think all it takes to kill you is 10 mA through the heart. So , that being the case, what are your survival chances if there is no path through the heart ? For example if the path of least resistance is through a finger , an arm and down a leg but not through the body to the limbs on the other side (not through the chest) ? In a case like that you can have some muscle or nerve damage in the hand or limb that touches the live ac but it won't stop your heart because it is not passing through the heart muscles. In my case I had one hand on the right side of the metal frame and the other hand on the left side of the metal frame and my finger brushed against the fuse holder on the bottom of the unit causing a path through the tip of my finger through my left hand to the frame but it startled me so much I let go of the unit and jumped back. The unit was on a carpet covered cart so it only dropped about an inch onto the cart. The key is to keep one hand behind your back to prevent a path of current through the heart. If you watch electricians working on live equipment you will see the guy working may have one hand behind his back. If not, there will be a second guy standing behind him watching everything he does. If you want to be really safe, get a ground braid and connect it to Protective Earth GND and tie the other end around the wrist of the hand that will be working close to the live wires. If your hand touches the live wire the current will go through your hand and straight to GND without passing through your heart.

Thank you for your comment. I will do work with a wrist ground strap on my working hand.