how to build arduino with smd ?

Solder paste is what it says, very small particals of solder in a flux paste. You apply it to the PCB then put your component in it at both ends. Then you place it in an oven and the solder melts, the surface tension pulls the component closer to the board and the joint is made.

Never use it myself, just an iron with a fine tip. There is no need for a hot air rework station to be more expensive than a decent iron.

Grumpy_Mike:
Solder paste is what it says, very small particals of solder in a flux paste.
You apply it to the PCB then put your component in it at both ends. Then you place it in an oven and the solder melts, the surface tension pulls the component closer to the board and the joint is made.

Never use it myself, just an iron with a fine tip. There is no need for a hot air rework station to be more expensive than a decent iron.

but the guy in the video used it in a very easy way, he put the flux and then used the hot air gun and that’s it ?

Normally the paste is applied by a silk screen mask so all the placements are done at the same time, the the soldering is done at the same time in an oven.

That technique in the video is basically what I do only instead of paste it put a small blob of solder on one pad. Place a resistor on it, apply an iron and position the resistor with tweezers. Then solder up the other end. That way I don’t need the hot air system.

While you can pay a lot for a hot air system I did see on at a model engineering show for £40. I wish I had got that now, but hot air only comes into its own when you want to remove something from a board with more than two connectors, like transistors and ICs.

Grumpy_Mike: Normally the paste is applied by a silk screen mask so all the placements are done at the same time, the the soldering is done at the same time in an oven.

That technique in the video is basically what I do only instead of paste it put a small blob of solder on one pad. Place a resistor on it, apply an iron and position the resistor with tweezers. Then solder up the other end. That way I don't need the hot air system.

While you can pay a lot for a hot air system I did see on at a model engineering show for £40. I wish I had got that now, but hot air only comes into its own when you want to remove something from a board with more than two connectors, like transistors and ICs.

i didn't really get what you mean, can you please tell me the name of that method so i can look it out ?

I made my Arduino with this
http://www.avelmak.sk/index.php?lm=1440&pg=det&article=58048

can you please tell me the name of that method so i can look it out ?

]As far as I know it doesn't have a special name, it is just what I do. No one taught me to do it.

Budvar10: I made my Arduino with this http://www.avelmak.sk/index.php?lm=1440&pg=det&article=58048

you did the one in the picture or something similar ?

there is no point of remaking the arduino, it's not what i really want, what i want is to take the chip which was programmed by arduino board and put it in a final circuit without using the Uno board or else in my circuit just using the Atmega + the components needed from capacitor and else ...

The process is called "Re-Flow" soldering.

Firash, without being disrespectful to you, it sounds as though you have a lot of enthusiasm, but have yet to gain the knowledge and experience. I understand this position is not the easiest to move forward from sometimes, but simply banging out question after question is not the best way to approach it.

Hit google, use the search engines on the forums across the net, read, read and read more.

Then when you have questions, they will be within a context of your knowledge and communication can begin efficiently.

There are cheapo hot air stations, and you can do some qfp and smd with them. Most of them come with the caveat they may kill you, and have to be checked by experienced person, so I am not posting links. Someone with the *atten*tion spam would find them anyway... at your own risk.

Foggiest: The process is called "Re-Flow" soldering.

Firash, without being disrespectful to you, it sounds as though you have a lot of enthusiasm, but have yet to gain the knowledge and experience. I understand this position is not the easiest to move forward from sometimes, but simply banging out question after question is not the best way to approach it.

Hit google, use the search engines on the forums across the net, read, read and read more.

Then when you have questions, they will be within a context of your knowledge and communication can begin efficiently.

There are cheapo hot air stations, and you can do some qfp and smd with them. Most of them come with the caveat they may kill you, and have to be checked by experienced person, so I am not posting links. Someone with the *atten*tion spam would find them anyway... at your own risk.

you're right, but i am just trying to get some guidance because when i hit google i get articles and pages from all over and sometimes everyone of them is different

about the last part what did you mean exactly it can kill you ?! is it the cheap station you mean or my final circuit if it's bad ?

The cheap station. Some cheap (very low quality) Chinese electronic devices that use mains power are not safe to use.

Shpaget: The cheap station. Some cheap (very low quality) Chinese electronic devices that use mains power are not safe to use.

ah ok you are right, once i bought a chinese cheap adapter, when i plugged it, it explode i was lucky that my head wasn't exactly above it, because if it was i would have ended up with injury if not dead !

Isn't there some legal clause that you must identify an Arduino developed product? After going to the trouble of your own board design and manufacture (sub), you may have to market that as an Arduino product.

A consideration before you get in deep.

Anyhoo, OP might find this interesting: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5uiroWBkdFY

Quote from: Budvar10 on 24-12-2014, 14:14:22

I made my Arduino with this
http://www.avelmak.sk/index.php?lm=1440&pg=det&article=58048

you did the one in the picture or something similar ?

Yes I did. By my hands. http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=277260.msg1957103#msg1957103
It was the first time in my life to solder something like FTDI chip is. It was a challenge. But with hot air and some practice is not a big problem. For me is most important to have a magnifying lens about 20x or better to have a microscope. I used 1206 components, smaller looks like dust for my eyes, but now I venture to work with a smaller.
Station which I used is cheap Chinese product but is very solid, good quality, regulation is accurate and I have not the slightest problem with it.

@Shpaget

The cheap station.
Some cheap (very low quality) Chinese electronic devices that use mains power are not safe to use.

Everything is made in China nowadays: computers, clothes, shoes, cars or components for a car at least etc.
:wink:

Not everything.
On the Weller station I use it says “Made in Germany”. My camera is from Japan.

Anyway, I wasn’t trying to say that everything made in China was bad, just that those very cheap things that are made in China are usually low quality.

I know what you want to say, just keeping conversation. :) BTW: I have a German car with a lot of Chinese components inside as I find out. Sorry for OT.

Foggiest: Isn't there some legal clause that you must identify an Arduino developed product? After going to the trouble of your own board design and manufacture (sub), you may have to market that as an Arduino product.

A consideration before you get in deep.

Anyhoo, OP might find this interesting: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5uiroWBkdFY

first, i am not really asking to duplicate an arduino because there is no point at all in duplicating it, what i want is to be able to program by the IDE and of arduino and then take that chip and make it work in a professional circuit without having the arduino board hanging in or shown there that's why ...

thanks for the video nice one :)

Budvar10: you did the one in the picture or something similar ? Yes I did. By my hands. http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=277260.msg1957103#msg1957103 It was the first time in my life to solder something like FTDI chip is. It was a challenge. But with hot air and some practice is not a big problem. For me is most important to have a magnifying lens about 20x or better to have a microscope. I used 1206 components, smaller looks like dust for my eyes, but now I venture to work with a smaller. Station which I used is cheap Chinese product but is very solid, good quality, regulation is accurate and I have not the slightest problem with it.

@ShpagetEverything is made in China nowadays: computers, clothes, shoes, cars or components for a car at least etc. ;)

there is chinese products that are number 1 quality and products that are useless and bad quality they have that very cheap maybe the cheapest bad quality in the world because of the lowest cost that it can hit as we all know

Shpaget: Not everything. On the Weller station I use it says "Made in Germany". My camera is from Japan.

Anyway, I wasn't trying to say that everything made in China was bad, just that those very cheap things that are made in China are usually low quality.

I was talking about a specific make and model of hot air station. It has a very poor earth scheme and a mains heating element in the metal nozzle.

Hi, it sounds like you have not done any SMD or PCB design work?

What CAD program are you going to use to do this job? What level of electronic and programming do you have? This will help us explain and guide you to some sort of solution.

Do you have equipment to do SMD work?

Tom.... :)