How to "complete" a project, 3D printing? CNC machining? Pre-made kits?

Hello everyone,

Please see my previous topic relating to teaching girls using Arduino and R******* Pi's.

So I'm a teacher and I've started a new program in my IT and Programming class using micro-controller boards as a focus.

We spent the first few weeks learning to do some basic IO projects using the Arduino Uno. We are ready to dive into a project.

Question: How exactly do I physically connect servos, motors, sensors into a project? How do I bring a project from breadboard to completion?
For instance, lets say a student wants to assemble a Smarties sorter project. How would you attach a servo motor to a gear, arms, conveyor belt? Are there general purpose "building boards" that you can buy to put together a project?

We have a small 3D printer that can print 20x16x20cm but that is time intensive not only to print, but to design the object. I could use Lego Technic pieces, but it takes 5 weeks to receive blocks and how would you connect a generic servo to a technic block? Just glue it?

Thanks guys!

Question: How exactly do I physically connect servos, motors, sensors into a project?

You need to mount the servo on some sort of frame and then couple the servo to the device you want to control.

I have found using angled aluminum good for making frames and I use M3 nuts and bolts to fasten them together. Then coupling the part that has to move then use the servo "horn" and wire links. Normally these are steel wire but you can get away with copper if you like. My Mulder project uses three servos, maybe you can get some idea of what needs to be done from here. As well as the video the write up is available on a free download.
Mulder

How do I bring a project from breadboard to completion?

Once you have a working project on breadboard then I would use strip board to solder it all up and provide a permanent reliable project.

The box or case or mechanical aspects of a project can be just as challenging as the electronics parts.

There are kits that allow random construction of the mechanical aspects but they are expensive. Look at robot making stuff and model makers suppliers.

danielchow:
So I'm a teacher

? ? ? Student ? ? ?

...R

Robin2:
? ? ? Student ? ? ?

...R

LOL yes, I can be both. :slight_smile:

Grumpy_Mike:
You need to mount the servo on some sort of frame and then couple the servo to the device you want to control.

I have found using angled aluminum good for making frames and I use M3 nuts and bolts to fasten them together. Then coupling the part that has to move then use the servo "horn" and wire links. Normally these are steel wire but you can get away with copper if you like. My Mulder project uses three servos, maybe you can get some idea of what needs to be done from here. As well as the video the write up is available on a free download.
Mulder
Once you have a working project on breadboard then I would use strip board to solder it all up and provide a permanent reliable project.

The box or case or mechanical aspects of a project can be just as challenging as the electronics parts.

There are kits that allow random construction of the mechanical aspects but they are expensive. Look at robot making stuff and model makers suppliers.

Thanks Grumps,

I was hoping to one day get into actually printing and acid etching a board. But that'll come later. Thats a cool link, how they put the wheels right onto the Arduino board itself! Great ideas, will chew on it awhile.