How to connect my AC power cord to my new power supply

Hello,

I recently purchased a 24V power supply (shown in the photo) from eBay (model S-60-24 , by a company called Mean Well). It came with no documentation, and I can not find a hookup manual online.

I live in California, US, so our electrical wiring in the walls has a white conductor, black conductor, and green conductor. I know the green is for ground, and I believe the white is for ‘neutral’, and the black one is for ‘live/hot’.

My question though, is how do I hook up an AC power cable to this 24V power supply? I believe the symbol that is the center connection is for ground, and I would think that the ‘L’ stands for ‘Live/hot/black’, and the ‘N’ stands for ‘Neutral/white’? (again, see photo)

Additionally, the spare power cable that I found (also shown in the picture) laying around in my garage doesn’t have any kind of colored insulation except for the green/ground one (center wire). So once I find out what the ‘L’ and ‘N’ mean on the power supply, I don’t know which wire is black, and which one is white on my power cord. But after a bit of searching it looks like if you look at a wall outlet normally, the top left prong slot is for the white/neutral wire, so then the top right prong slot would be for the black/live wire? (I know the bottom/center/round prong is for ground)

I just want to make sure I do this right the first time as I really don’t feel like blowing something up or shocking myself or something.

Thanks!

Make sure that the wire you think is ground is connected to the round pin on the plug using a multimeter or, if you haven’t got one, a battery and a bulb.
Connect that wire to the terminal with the ground symbol. The other two wires are interchangeable so it doesn’t matter which goes to L and which to N.

Be careful and double check everything. Your mains voltage is half what we have here but is still lethal!

Russell.

Wires in the wall? I'm not sure if it's even allowed to connect up an open-frame power supply like you have, as a permanent installation.

L means Live, and is Brown in Europe, and Black in the US. N means Nautral and is blue in Europe, White in the US. PE is Protection Ground and is Yellow/Green in Europe, Green in the US.

// Per.

hi,

find out which wire is for the third terminal of your power supply first

use a multitester

connect it first and then

the other two wires --------------->either one to the L(live) and the N(netural) of your power supply

( from your post you are right about which wire is which since this is AC so L and N can be interchangeable)

make sure you fasten the screws tight those three wires must be separate


V+ DC positive output

V- DC ground

v adjust --- adjust the d/c voltages

I believe the power supply is made in China. Open-frame power supplies without any covers like this are unsafe.

good luck and be safe!

siutoejai: I believe the power supply is made in China and open-frame power supplies without any covers like this are unsafe.

Mean Well is a known quality brand of power supplies. They are some of the best industrial power supplies from China.

But, it's not meant to be connected in a permanent installation. You still need som have some fuses and noise filtration before it's input.

// Per.

Mean Well is a known quality brand of power supplies. They are some of the best industrial power supplies from China.

I know what you mean, but a few devices from those quality companies have disappointed me. :smiling_imp:

Maybe I am just unlucky.

Cheers

siutoejai: the green wire in the middle ----> the third terminal from the left of your power supply

The cable shown in the picture doesn't seem to have a green wire. The centre one is blue on my screen. Also, the left hand wire is clearly marked "CONDUCTOR FOR GROUNDING". That's why I suggested checking with a multimeter or other means of continuity check.

If you can't check that cable yourself get someone who can to check it for you. Better safe than sorry!

Russell.

Hi

I have corrected it

on my side the middle wire hm...

anyway

he should find out which wire is which with a multitester

Additionally, the spare power cable that I found (also shown in the picture) laying around in my garage doesn't have any kind of colored insulation except for the green/ground one (center wire).

Are you sure the centre wire is green?

To be safe, I strongly suggest you find out which wire is which with a multitester first.

Hi,

I believe the power supply is made in China. Open-frame power supplies without any covers like this are unsafe.

The open frame is not unsafe when used by qualified electrical technicians, as stated in an earlier post they are for installations in an enclosure. That is why Mean Well also supply the same power supply in a plastic enclosure already fitted with a mains power lead. So that this sort of confusion doesn't happen.

My suggestion is to find a qualified sparky and get him/her to fit the lead/plug, tell him/her where you want to put it and see if he/she thinks its safe.

Tom.... :)

My suggestion is to find a qualified sparky and get him to fit the lead/plug, tell him where you want to put it and see if he/she thinks its safe.

Nice suggestion.

:)

The ribbed lead is Neutral.
With the Gnd prong down, looking at the jack, the slot on the left, the wider slot, is Neutral.
(The wider prong of the plug should go to Neutral.)
There should be a fuse (SB) between the cord and the supply.
Look for an IEC receptacle, preferably one with a fuse box.

http://www.meanwell.com/search/S-60/S-60-spec.pdf

It does matter to get the L and N correct (EMI filter, protection circuit, safety), otherwise the terminals wouldn't be labelled as such.

I think that this is quite dangerous for someone asking these sorts of questions. Electricity can kill you.

you need to put in an approved box… something like this:

http://t.homedepot.com/p/Wiegmann-8-in-x-8-in-x-4-in-NEMA-1-Screw-Cover-Box-with-Knockouts-SC080804RC/100537130/

if you plan to use it inside only…

you can use the knock outs to connect a cord, just make sure you bond the box, ground, and power supply ground together.

dlloyd: It does matter to get the L and N correct (EMI filter, protection circuit, safety), otherwise the terminals wouldn't be labelled as such.

True to a very limited extent.

The EMI filter is necessarily symmetric, will have capacitors from both lines to ground. After the rectifier, there is no discrimination. The only components in between are the fuse and NTC thermistor (surge limiter) which should by preference, be in the "live" line.

As long as the ground is correctly made, other details are much less important.

More of a concern is that if the output is not tied to the frame ground (as you usually do not want it to be), you do need to trust the isolation between primary and secondary of the transformer.

Qdeathstar: I think that this is quite dangerous for someone asking these sorts of questions. Electricity can kill you.

It is certainly a concern advising people on matters where we know what we are doing and perform these tasks confidently, based on experience and presumably, some direction from a qualified mentor "back then". We would prefer to be present to watch the person and see the steps performed. Not so easy by "remote control". :grinning:

Not so easy by "remote control".

:sunglasses:

I hope he will show up safe.

Wow! Thank you so much everyone for all of the replies. Arduino and the community is so awesome!

Also, I’m so sorry that I’m only just now replying. When I was starting this thread, I’m sure I had the ‘Notify me of replies’ checkbox checked, but I didn’t get a single email notification of any of your replies, so I had no idea that all you guys were posting replies to me. I thought it was strange that no one was replying to this post, so I just decided to finally go and check this thread just to be sure, and sure enough, I’ve been bombarded with so many great replies!

So, onto the actual subject:

First I want to mention that when I was talking about the wires in the wall, I didn’t mean that I was actually taking off an electrical wall plate, and removing the receptacle out to hook up my power supply directly to it. Sorry if I made it sound like I wanted to do that. I’m not messing with the house wiring.

Regarding the new attached photo that I’m attaching to this post:
Since a lot of you suggested finding out for sure which wire goes to which prong, I went ahead and did that - I checked continuity with my multimeter - the round prong is definitely connected to the center/green wire on the bare end. Then I did the same for the other 2 wires / prongs. I edited the photo to show which wire goes to what prong. And with a black permanent marker I colored the ‘A’ wire black, and also made a black ‘dot’ next to the corresponding prong on the plug.

@Russell - hopefully to help alleviate your concern, I thought I’d mention that the word ‘green’ is partially cut off in the photo I attached…looking further down the cord, it clearly says ‘Green conductor for grounding…’

And hopefully to alleviate a lot of you others’ concerns, I’m not 100% ‘green’ (pun intended) when it comes to electricity/electronics. I have had a bit of experience with both. But I’ve never worked with a power supply like this, and just want to be sure that I’m going to hook it up the first time.

@Runaway Pancake - Is it pretty standard for the ‘ribbed’ lead to always be Neutral on power cords in the US? (I never noticed that)

Ok, so a couple of you mentioned using a fuse before the input…so somewhere before the AC input basically. What’s the best/cleanest/safest way of doing that?

I guess that’s all I have for now. Thank you again everyone for all your replies and all the suggestions/concerns that were in them.

(Hopefully I’ll get email notifications this time - I am looking at the ‘Notify me of replies’ checkbox and it is definitely checked!

P.S. If anyone was wondering, this is all related to Arduino - I’m trying to power a 24V stepper motor (that I pulled from a cheap, used Samsung laser printer), and am going to use Arduino to control it. :slight_smile:

Hi,

Glad you are back and I am not color blind. :slight_smile:

siutoejai: I am not color blind. :slight_smile:

I must be. It still looks blue on my screen!

Russell

domiflichi:
Ok, so a couple of you mentioned using a fuse before the input…so somewhere before the AC input basically. What’s the best/cleanest/safest way of doing that?

It should already be inside the unit. That is what I mentioned in my comments. Take a look.