How to drive 12v 20W bulbs with arduino without relay..??

I would like to drive 12v 20W filament bulbs with arduino..
I do not want to use relays as the operation timings will be sometimes as fast as 30milliseconds..

What MOSFETs should I use to drive these bulbs..??
or there is any other ways to drive them..??

I would like to stick to the cheaper side with minimum heat generation.. 8)

What MOSFETs should I use to drive these bulbs..??
or there is any other ways to drive them..??

Logic level MOSFET or solid state relays.

The best device to use is a logic level power N-channel MOSFET transistor with a low Ron value (some millivolts) and rated to handle well above 5 amps or more.

Certainly something like this would work:

Lefty

zoomkat:

What MOSFETs should I use to drive these bulbs..??
or there is any other ways to drive them..??

Logic level MOSFET or solid state relays.

I'm rather careful recommending solid state relays, the vast majority are AC switching only and the ones that are DC vary in specifications such that it's difficult for many beginners to tell if a specific DC SSR is suitable for their application or not.

Lefty

Is it possible for an incandescent light bulb to illuminate in 30mS ?

Do you have 50 or 60 Hz electricity ?

jackrae:
Is it possible for an incandescent light bulb to illuminate in 30mS ?

Its possible, it depends on the thickness of the filament, low voltage bulbs have thicker
filaments which take longer to come up to steady-state temperature. 12V 20W might or
might not manage it.

For a MOSFET remember the bulb filament when cold will demand about 8 to 10 times the
hot current, briefly. So a MOSFET that can handle 20A pulses would be sensible, and for
simple thermal design pick one that has an Rds(on) of 0.1 ohm or less - in fact 50 milliOhm
or less would help with the current spike on switch-on. And remember it needs to be
logic-level.

For my Slide projector controller that used a CDP1802, I left a small current running through the bulbs at all times - just enough for a red glow - to avoid shortening the bulb life.