How to mount in a weather proof box RESOLVED

I am putting an Arduino in a weather proof box next to the A/C compressor. It will monitor freon pressure, several temperatures, and current draw. Inside the box will be the arduino, its power supply, several current sensor, etc.

I want to minimize the holes through the box so need some type of a board or plate that I can mount inside the box, then mount everything else to the plate. The will leave me with only four holes through that weatherproof box.

What name should be used to refer to such an item? Suggestions as to where to buy it?

For temperature sensors I selected devices that are T092-3 form. The leads are closer together than I realized. Is there some type of breadboard printed circuit thing I could use to solder this device to then solder my sensor wires to it?

bkelly:
What name should be used to refer to such an item? Suggestions as to where to buy it?

Subpanel. A starting point. Scroll down the page to see the subpanel offerings. Resist the urge to go smaller to save buck$. It doesn't take a lot for things to get crowded quickly in a small box. Not just the components but having room to maneuver with fingers and tools gets tricky.

To get an idea what you need, cut out a piece of cardboard of the same size as the panel you intend to mount on. Lay out all the components on the paper where you think they should be leaving room between components for wire runs/terminations. Don't forget to account for things mounted on the door or sides of the enclosure projecting inward.

If you add a sub-panel, these links might be of interest.

https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=445951.600

https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=445951.msg3858120#msg3858120

Thank you. Now that you mentioned it, I wish I had found that thought/idea/concept on my own. Working it now. Wonderful response from both of you.

Thank You For Your Time.

Hi,

Other: My favorite cheap Weatherproof Boxes:

[https://www.harborfreight.com/catalogsearch/result/index/?

dir=asc&order=EAScore%2Cf%2CEAFeatured+Weight%2Cf%2CSale+Rank%2Cf&q=ammo](https://www.harborfreight.com/catalogsearch/result/index/?dir=asc&order=EAScore%2Cf%2CEAFeatured+Weight%2Cf%2CSale+Rank%2Cf&q=ammo)

The plastic one:

Makes it easy to hot-glue a subpanel or other parts. I just drill holes for cables and hot-glue them in place. Not elegant, not commercial quality, but good enough for most things...

bkelly:
For temperature sensors I selected devices that are T092-3 form. The leads are closer together than I realized. Is there some type of breadboard printed circuit thing I could use to solder this device to then solder my sensor wires to it?

I'd use stripboard. You can cut it to any size you like. I use a hacksaw for this purpose.

bkelly:
I want to minimize the holes through the box so need some type of a board or plate that I can mount inside the box, then mount everything else to the plate. The will leave me with only four holes through that weatherproof box.

I'd consider using a piece of stripboard for that purpose too. That assumes a significant number of your components are in a form that allows you to solder them to the stripboard (e.g. Arduino Nano, Pro Mini, MKR). Although stripboard is more expensive than some alternative materials which would be as suitable to provide mechanical support, the stripboard has the added advantage of facilitating electrical connections between the components.

Stripboard! I knew what it was but had no name for it. A search brought it right up. Just what the engineer ordered. Thanks. Easy to find and pretty cheap.
From the earlier posts I picked a NEMA 3 enclosure that had internal mounts and a subpanel mounting kit. Those other links were cool just to see what people are doing.

That gets me going. Thank you for your time.

You're welcome. I love stripboard. It makes it pretty fast to make circuit boards. Figuring out how to efficiently route the connections is almost like a crossword puzzle. My preference is the type of stripboard that has the solder mask over the strips:

The reason is that without the solder mask the solder tends to flow along the strips, which makes it a little slower and not as clean looking. The regular stripboard works fine though, and is cheaper.