How to strip a Http header

Hi,
I need to get a 10 digit number from my web page but I just cannot seem to get it right.

I read many posts on this but still cannot figure it out.

I got as far as getting the entire web header on my monitor buy just cannot strip it out.

Any help is appreciated.
TIA

web header:

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<head>
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8" />
<title>Untitled Document</title>
</head>
<body>
1481046742</body>     <-- Need this number
</html>

my code:

// (c) Copyright 2010-2012 MCQN Ltd.
// Released under Apache License, version 2.0
//
// Simple example to show how to use the HttpClient library
// Get's the web page given at http://<kHostname><kPath> and
// outputs the content to the serial port

#include <SPI.h>
#include <HttpClient.h>
#include <ESP8266WiFi.h>

// Name of the server we want to connect to
const char kHostname[] = "http://myweb";
// Path to download (this is the bit after the hostname in the URL
// that you want to download
const char kPath[] = "/";

// Number of milliseconds to wait without receiving any data before we give up
const int kNetworkTimeout = 30 * 1000;
// Number of milliseconds to wait if no data is available before trying again
const int kNetworkDelay = 1000;

const char* ssid     = "****";
const char* password = "****";

String httpHeader;

void getHttpHeader(void);

void setup() {
  Serial.begin(115200);
  delay(10);

  // We start by connecting to a WiFi network
  Serial.println();
  Serial.println();
  Serial.print("Connecting to ");
  Serial.println(ssid);

  WiFi.begin(ssid, password);

  while (WiFi.status() != WL_CONNECTED) {
    delay(500);
    Serial.print(".");
  }

  Serial.println("");
  Serial.println("WiFi connected");
  Serial.println("IP address: ");
  Serial.println(WiFi.localIP());
}

void loop()
{
  getHttpHeader();
}

void getHttpHeader() {
  int err = 0;

  WiFiClient c;
  HttpClient http(c);

  err = http.get(kHostname, kPath);
  if (err == 0)
  {
    Serial.println("startedRequest ok");

    err = http.responseStatusCode();
    if (err >= 0)
    {
      Serial.print("Got status code: ");
      Serial.println(err);

      // Usually you'd check that the response code is 200 or a
      // similar "success" code (200-299) before carrying on,
      // but we'll print out whatever response we get

      err = http.skipResponseHeaders();
      if (err >= 0)
      {
        int bodyLen = http.contentLength();
        Serial.print("Content length is: ");
        Serial.println(bodyLen);
        Serial.println();
        Serial.println("Body returned follows:");

        // Now we've got to the body, so we can print it out
        unsigned long timeoutStart = millis();
        char c;
        // Whilst we haven't timed out & haven't reached the end of the body
        while ( (http.connected() || http.available()) &&
                ((millis() - timeoutStart) < kNetworkTimeout) )
        {
          if (http.available())
          {
            c = http.read();
            // Print out this character
            Serial.print(c);
            bodyLen--;
            // We read something, reset the timeout counter
            timeoutStart = millis();
          }
          else
          {
            // We haven't got any data, so let's pause to allow some to
            // arrive
            delay(kNetworkDelay);
          }
        }
      }
      else
      {
        Serial.print("Failed to skip response headers: ");
        Serial.println(err);
      }
    }
    else
    {
      Serial.print("Getting response failed: ");
      Serial.println(err);
    }
  }
  else
  {
    Serial.print("Connect failed: ");
    Serial.println(err);
  }
  http.stop();

  // And just stop, now that we've tried a download
  while (1);
}
            c = http.read();
            // Print out this character
            Serial.print(c);

What is c?

  WiFiClient c;
        char c;

Why do you have two variables with the same name with radically different types?

All you do with the data you get from the server is print it. It is impossible to parse data you don't hold onto.

If you save the data, starting when a < arrives, and testing what you have when a > arrives, you can determine if was the type. If it is, save the data in a different array until the next < arrives (the one that indicates the end of the body).

Ok, changed WiFiClient c; to WiFiClient w; for better practice, thanks.

I guess my basic problem is not knowing how to capture the data between the

Found the solution here: