How would I program my breadboard arduino?

Based on the schematic below:

I assume I would program it using a ttl serial connection. Can I also assume that if I am using a usb-serial converter cable (prolific -- not sure which model) i would just need to wire up the correct cable and I'd be off to the races?

Or am I way off base?

This it not an answer to your question, but others had already remarked that the 22p @ RESET is no good!

You need a reset pulse of at least 1.5us which requires something of at least 1.5u/10k = 150p ... However 1 or 10nF are strongly recommmended.

That's an older schematic.. it is a 100nF on the acutal board...

I assume I would program it using a ttl serial connection. Can I also assume that if I am using a usb-serial converter cable (prolific -- not sure which model) i would just need to wire up the correct cable and I'd be off to the races?

Yes, that is one way. However which USB serial cable you use can be a problem. The standard Arduino platform has you load a USB driver file for the USB connection that assumes it is using a FTDI 232RL converter chip. Other brands of chips (including prolific ) would require a different USB driver file to be installed. Also the 'standard' Arduino uses the DTR signal from the converter chip to reset the Arduino (via a series capacitor wired to the reset pin) to start the bootloader code prior to performing the uploading process, not all serial converter cables provide this signal.

Some people use a small USB serial break-out board that uses the same chip as the standard Arduino board. http://www.sparkfun.com/commerce/product_info.php?products_id=9115

That all make sense?

Lefty

The usb to serial converter i have right now does work on windows 7, and gives me com5. If I understand you correctly, if I wire up the correct signals to my programming header I should be okay.

I see it as follows:

Correct?

based on the serial pinout here: http://jan.newmarch.name/internetdevices/embedded/9_PIN_PIN_OUT.GIF

Correct?

Possibly not. That diagram shows a DB9 connector which usually implies RS-232 voltage levels, typically +/- 12volt signals, not the TTL level signals, 0 and +5vdc levels. If your cable is using RS-232 voltage levels you will need a serial voltage converter chip like a MAX232 to convert (and invert logic levels) to TTL levels. Standalone USB serial cables come down to must need to know all the gory micro-details to tell if it's going to work for you.

Lefty

So it would not be safe to assume the prolific won't be suitable?

I am assuming it is this chip: http://www.prolific.com.tw/eng/Products.asp?ID=88 (to be precise it is a radioshack (nexxtech) 26-8042 adapter)

I further assume that the arduino's ftdi chip has this built in then.. hence the breakout boards that are floating around.

I'm pretty much just trying to not spend money to be able to program my new toy :slight_smile:

So it would not be safe to assume the prolific won't be suitable?

I would assume it is not correct until proven or measured that it inputs and outputs TTL voltage levels. The DB9 connector used is a very large hint that is using RS-232 voltage levels that would damage your standalone board.

The link you provided is of the basic chip used internally by the USB cable convertor but doesn't tell about the reset of the internal circuitry details of the cable.

I further assume that the arduino's ftdi chip has this built in then.. hence the breakout boards that are floating around.

Not sure what you are saying/asking here. Most standard Arduino USB boards have a FTDI 232RL converter chip mounted on the board, and therefore use standard USB cables that have no electronic inside them, just four conductors.
Lefty

My best bet is going to be a breakout board and/or cable then... I have a feeling the pinout of my programming header wouldnt match the breakout you linked to, correct?

Do you own a standard Arduino USB processor board also? If so you can use it as a serial converter for you breadboard arduino. Just remove the processor chip on the arduino from it's socket, then jumper ground, pin 0 and 1, and reset pin to your breadboard.

Lefty

:-?

Jumper from the empty socket? or from the standard pin headers? (either or i can assume, I'm just a little shocked at using it like that (good shocked mind you ;))

also, I do not have a pin for reset on my breadboard, is the timing that hard to get down? :slight_smile:

Jumper from the empty socket? or from the standard pin headers? (either or i can assume, I'm just a little shocked at using it like that (good shocked mind you

From the Arduino shield connector pins.

also, I do not have a pin for reset on my breadboard, is the timing that hard to get down?

The reset pin on the Arduino would wire to your SV-1 pin connector, this routes the DTR auto-reset pulse to your standalone reset pin through the series capacitor. Auto reset is a very useful feature. Manually resetting the board is possible, but the timing is very tricky as the bootloader now has a very short window for linking up to the IDE when wanting to upload.

Gotcha!

I will give that a shot tonight.. It work work fine as a stop-gap until I can get a breakout made/bought... are there any ic's in a dip package available? I'd love to make one myself, but I'm a little afraid of SMT at the moment :slight_smile:

It works! Thanks so much!!!

Here's a couple pics of the 'cable' i made up.. I used solid core wire so it will keep its shape a little better.


Cool that it's working for you, can't beat the price either!

are there any ic's in a dip package available? I'd love to make one myself, but I'm a little afraid of SMT at the moment

No dip versions that I'm aware of. There are posting around here on using cheap e-bay USB cable converters and modding them to work with the Arduino, titled $2 serial cable or such. Lots of success and failures have been reported, it seems there are so many variations of products that one can't be certain of what they are getting until they do and tare it apart.

Lefty