I have 24 volts... how do I??

Hey all, So I need to power my arduino via my generators 24volt battery supply... what’s the best way to step down to Arduino 12v? Is it via an adjustable power regulator like a LM317?

If so what’s the best design to prevent spikes and keep it clean? Any help is appreciated!

Thank you!

Use a switching buck converter, like this one.

Feed the 5V output directly into the 5V Vcc pin of the Arduino, bypassing the barrel jack (which requires 7V or greater).

The suggested regulator can only provide 300 mA to your project at 5V, so choose one with larger current capability if you need more.

If your project requires 12V for something other than the Arduino, it is better and more energy efficient to use two regulators (one 12V and one 5V) than to provide 12V to the barrel jack.

Thanks for the input suggestion.. I will do some research on those regulators.

Can you get a USB charger that works from 24v? They generally provide one or two amps at 5v. I know the 12v ones are cheap.

...R

jremington: like this one.

I like the form factor of that one. I'm amazed at how many of the common step down or boost modules have off-grid pins. I bought one of each of the ones sold on eBay and less than 1/2 are on-grid.

Hi Pert, What is "off-grid" in this context?

pert: I like the form factor of that one. I'm amazed at how many of the common step down or boost modules have off-grid pins. I bought one of each of the ones sold on eBay and less than 1/2 are on-grid.

Been using one of these in a 12V project ( 100 to 750 mA) for 24 / 7 more than 2 years with no problems but I never see them recommended. ?? https://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/murata-power-solutions-inc/OKI-78SR-5-1.5-W36-C/811-2196-5-ND/2259781 https://power.murata.com/data/power/oki-78sr.pdf

It's very nice, but quite spendy. The Chinese modules on eBay/Aliexpress are ~1/10 the price, though I'm sure also lower quality.

fmeroney: What is "off-grid" in this context?

On-grid is 0.1" pin spacing. That means you can plug into a solderless breadboard, stripboard, perfboard, 0.1" header, etc. Off-grid means you either need to make a custom PCB or else mount the module separate and connect it to the rest of your circuit with wires. Many of the modules don't have mounting holes so this makes things even more difficult (I don't mess with mounting electronics using glue or tape). Even the ones with mounting holes still mean extra work putting the matching holes in the surface you're attaching it to, and extra parts on the BOM for screws/standoffs/nuts.

Well that is good to know!!

Thanks

pert: On-grid is 0.1" pin spacing. That means you can plug into a solderless breadboard, stripboard, perfboard, 0.1" header, etc. Off-grid means you either need to make a custom PCB or else mount the module separate and connect it to the rest of your circuit with wires. Many of the modules don't have mounting holes so this makes things even more difficult (I don't mess with mounting electronics using glue or tape). Even the ones with mounting holes still mean extra work putting the matching holes in the surface you're attaching it to, and extra parts on the BOM for screws/standoffs/nuts.

pert: I like the form factor of that one. I'm amazed at how many of the common step down or boost modules have off-grid pins. I bought one of each of the ones sold on eBay and less than 1/2 are on-grid.

You means the one's with unpopulated pads, I think you are expected to just solder wires to them. Some have screw terminals, so no special grid alignment is expected.

The only sort I'd expect to be 0.1" pitch are the encapsulated sort or TO220 replacement sort which are explicitly designed for pcb mounting.

Surface mount modules often have 2mm pitch these days, or finer.

I'm talking about something like this: How am I supposed to use that without making a custom PCB or gluing it to an enclosure?

What was the use case the designer had in mind? I'd think these modules would be targeted to hobbyist customers because it doesn't seem like it would be used in a consumer product.

Double sided sticky pad? (Which will of course fall apart after a few years).