I need an idea to change direction of juice between cup

Hi, I want to make a juice dispenser using Arduino and control it from Bluetooth, I have a problem When the juice is poured into cups,i have two cups, i want to control the juice way 'cup1 or cup2' , i have make this idea , i don't know if is good , i have used a servo motor to turn the tube between cup 1 and 2

A servo is an "angle-motor" so if you can design the mechanics and if you're servo is powerful enough it should work.

The nice thing about a servo is it has a built-in driver so you only have to supply power and the proper servo control pulses from the Arduino.

I could also be done with valves (and two spouts), or a geared-down DC motor with a position sensor at each stop position. You can run & reverse a DC motor with an H-Bridge or you can use two relays... One relay to turn the motor on/off and another (DPDT) relay to set the direction.

I would have thought of solenoid valves but this looks like a good solution as long as you don't mind a bit of dribbling between cups.

Just make sure to use a drinking water grade tube so it doesn't contaminate the juice. In the case of this sort of plumbing pipe, it will be marked with the NSF-61 or NSF-PW rating if it's drinking water safe.

pert:
I would have thought of solenoid valves but this looks like a good solution as long as you don't mind a bit of dribbling between cups.

Just make sure to use a drinking water grade tube so it doesn't contaminate the juice. In the case of this sort of plumbing pipe, it will be marked with the NSF-61 or NSF-PW rating if it's drinking water safe.

The problem in the solenoid valve is the red part in the picture below, when the first solenoid is open there will be little juice left in the red part of the second, and i will get a mixed juice :slight_smile:

About the plastic type, i will keep this advice in my mind, thanks

You could open the first solenoid again after the bowl is empty to drain that leftover juice into the first cup.

aymannox:
The problem in the solenoid valve is the red part in the picture below, when the first solenoid is open there will be little juice left in the red part of the second, and i will get a mixed juice :slight_smile:

About the plastic type, i will keep this advice in my mind, thanks

Your original post does not mention there being more than one type of drink. If there is more than one kind of drink then as well as moving the nozzle between cups you are still going to require solenoids to detemine which drink flows down the nozzle.

pert:
You could open the first solenoid again after the bowl is empty to drain that leftover juice into the first cup.

I will add a sugar dispenser so if someone request juice with sugar and the next one don't like sugar we will have a problem because it will be little sweet juice left :slight_smile: , for that i thing the servo motor idea is better, what do you think

You're going to have some traces of the previous drink either way. The question is how much of a trace is considered acceptable for your application. You could flush the lines into a 3rd cup to clear out traces of the previous drink. This might be wasteful, or it could just provide an interesting "mystery drink" for someone who's thirsty and adventurous.

I think you are changing your requirements again :slight_smile:

You started by implying that you wanted to dispense one type of drink into one of two possible cups. Then you made it seem as if there were two or more types of drink because you said you wanted to avoid a "mixed juice". Now you are going back to there being one type of drink but with or without sugar.

I think the servo solution sounds fine, you would dispense the sugar first then wash it out of the nozzle by dispensing the drink.

Before making a decision though you really need a detailed specification of exactly what you want to do as it affects both your mechanical and software design.

I would think a person would not be able to taste a few drops of prune juice in a .25 liter glass of apple juice.

but I would question how are you putting juice in the bowl ?
for me, there is some part of the juice source that I do not understand.

if you have 10 juices, put a solenoid on each, then one solenoid under the bowl.
add your percentages by opening each solenoid as you need. add sugar. ... etc
stir, dispense
run a water cycle to rinse.

how does the Orange, Mango, Cherry taste ?

ardly:
I think the servo solution sounds fine, you would dispense the sugar first then wash it out of the nozzle by dispensing the drink.

Before making a decision though you really need a detailed specification of exactly what you want to do as it affects both your mechanical and software design.

I am sorry because I was not careful

dave-in-nj:
but I would question how are you putting juice in the bowl ?
for me, there is some part of the juice source that I do not understand.

as you said, I will put for each bottle a solenoid valve, after request, I will put sugar If someone wants it
, finally, Pour the juice in the two cups ' the first is large and the second is small'

aymannox:
I am sorry because I was not careful

as you said, I will put for each bottle a solenoid valve, after request, I will put sugar If someone wants it
, finally, Pour the juice in the two cups ' the first is large and the second is small'

You are doing it again :slight_smile:

Now the cups are different sizes!

If the reason you are using the servo to move the spout between the two cups is because the cups are different sizes then maybe you would be better to put the cups on a rotary table and rotate the required size of cup under a non-moving nozzle. Another solution would be to use the same sized cup for both big and small drinks.

Don't be sorry but try to realise that you need to be very exact when you specify automated systems.
It is also a really good idea to try and avoid reinventing the wheel. Look at existing drinks machines and see how they have solved the problem. Maybe you can find a better way of doing things, but maybe they work the way they do because they have already seen problems with your novel solution.