I NEED HELP FOR A PROJECT ASAP PLEASE!! IT'S DUE IN 4 DAYS!!

Hello,
I’m making an air quality detecting device. I have a gas sensor that can detect a wide range of gases that is hooked up to the 5V port on my Arduino Uno. I’m adding a Bluetooth Module for sending data to an app. Can I use the 3.3V port on the Arduino to power the Bluetooth module instead of using voltage dividers? If I still need to use voltage dividers, have I set them up correctly (see attached photos)? The resistor values are 1K and 2K. My setup is exactly as according to this video VIDEO

Info:

  1. This is the Bluetooth Module I bought Bluetooth Module

Thank you so much! I need to finish this project by the end of the week.

jkg9:
Can I use the 3.3V port on the Arduino to power the Bluetooth module instead of using voltage dividers?

No, the BT module must be powered from the 5volt pin.
As you see on the Amazon page and the back of the module, it needs between 3.6 and 6volt.
The RX pin however needs level shifting (1:2 voltage divider) if you connect it to a 5volt Arduino.

Check your wiring.
I don’t see any ground wire to the BT module, and the voltage divider is connected wrong.

The video uses pin 0,1 on a Mega (USB<>Serial comms).
Bad/wrong, since a Mega has three other hardware serial ports.
That mistake means that you shouldn’t trust the rest of the video.

Use SoftwareSerial on two different pins (not 0,1).
Leo…

The legs of one of your resistors aren't connected to anything. Or at least it appears as if those legs aren't connected to anything. And the other resistor currently appears to be short circuited --- where one leg is electrically connected to its other leg.

Also, some jumper wire terminals (white green orange yellow) on your breadboard aren't connected to anything as well. And one of your circuit boards (the blue one) has all of its pins shorted together right now.

You will just need to review the usage of breadboards

If the gas sensor is an MQ type, it has to be burned in for 48 hours to be useful.

It is a real shame that you waited so long to start this project!

@jremington I did burn it for 48 hours already. Everything is ready to go. I have been working on this project for a while. It's a month-long assignment. This time I haven't procrastinated! I'm almost done!

Wawa:
No, the BT module must be powered from the 5volt pin.

The gas sensor is already taking up the 5V port. How else can I power the BT module? Use an external power source (for the BT module or the gas sensor)? Use voltage dividers with the 3.3V port?

jkg9:
I did burn it for 48 hours already.

jkg9:
The gas sensor is already taking up the 5V port.

All I see on the images of the first post is that all the pins of the gas sensor are shorted together.

You need to review how breadboards work (post#2).
Google it.
There is a whole row (4*25) of power pins available on each side of the breadboard.
Leo..

Wawa:
All I see on the images of the first post is that all the pins of the gas sensor are shorted together.

You need to review how breadboards work (post#2).
Google it.
There is a whole row (4*30) of power pins available on each side of the breadboard.
Leo..

Ok so let's say I fixed the pins. The 5V port still is being used by the gas sensor. Hold on. Would this tutorial be the solution? (look at Step 3: Schematics) http://www.instructables.com/id/How-to-Use-Gas-Sensors-Via-Bluetooth-From-Arduino-/

I think the BT module would still require voltage dividers? I emailed the manufacturer of my BT module and they said that using the 3.3V without voltage dividers isn't a good idea.

Did you spot the three errors in the BT diagram.

Never use an instructables.com example, unless you know more than the author of the article.
Leo..

First convince us that you understand breadboards.
Afer you googled, and understood it…
Unplug everything, and start with connecting power to the breadboard.

Arduino ground to a hole of the long 25-pin ground strip, next to the blue line.
Arduino 5volt to a hole of the long 25-pin supply strip, next to the red line.

Then plug the two modules parallel to the length of the strip, as the BT module in the pictures of post#0.
Not rightangles, as the gas sensor.
Then connect ground and power of the two modules to the long red and blue strips.
Then connect the data/signals to the Arduino pins.
Upload an image, so we can check.
Leo…

Wawa:
Then plug the two modules parallel to the length of the strip, as the BT module in the pictures of post#0.
Not rightangles, as the gas sensor.
Then connect ground and power of the two modules to the long red and blue strips.
Then connect the data/signals to the Arduino pins.
Upload an image, so we can check.
Leo…

Don’t I need to add resistors before plugging in the BT module? Won’t it burn out? I have everything else set up, like you said.

Yes, you need a 5volt to 3.3volt voltage divider on the RX pin.

Wire from BT TX pin to another Arduino pin (not 0 or 1). Could be 6.
1k resistor from BT RX to ground, and 2k from BT RX to an Arduino pin (not 0 or 1). Could be 7.

Then set up BT serial with softwareSerial on those pins.

Not sure about the gas sensor (post a link).
If it has an analogue output, then connect the output to A0.
Leo…

Wawa:
Then plug the two modules parallel to the length of the strip, as the BT module in the pictures of post#0.
Not rightangles, as the gas sensor.
Then connect ground and power of the two modules to the long red and blue strips.

Ok I'm almost done (I will upload a pic shortly). One quick question. Do the ground and power of the two modules have to be the on the same side (red or blue) of the Arduino power and ground? What I'm saying is that I plugged Arduino ground to a hole of the long 30-pin ground strip, next to the blue line and Arduino 5volt to a hole of the long 30-pin supply strip, next to the red line. For the modules, does the power need to be next to the red line and ground need to be next to the blue line? Here's a pic of what I have so far. Hold on I have to reply with the image after 5 minutes.

https://learn.sparkfun.com/tutorials/how-to-use-a-breadboard

All the pins (25 in your case) right next to the blue line are connected. You can use that strip as ground.

All the pins right next to the red line are connected. You can use that strip for 5volt power.

You have a second set on the other side of the breadboard.

Leo…

jkg9:
Ok I'm almost done (I will upload a pic shortly). One quick question. Do the ground and power of the two modules have to be the on the same side (red or blue) of the Arduino power and ground? What I'm saying is that I plugged Arduino ground to a hole of the long 25-pin ground strip, next to the blue line and Arduino 5volt to a hole of the long 25-pin supply strip, next to the red line. For the modules, does the power need to be next to the red line and ground need to be next to the blue line? Here's a pic of what I have so far. Hold on I have to reply with the image after 5 minutes.

Here is the pic

Ok so far.
Connect ground and power of both modules to the power strip.
Use black and red wires if you have them.
And upload the image.
Leo..

It’s all done now! Hopefully everything is connected correctly

Your left-hand-leg of the resistor on the 'left-side' of those new pictures appears to not be connected to anything. You should use a multimeter to check electrical continuity between that leg and whatever other points (nodes) that it is meant to be connected to. It just appears at the moment that you're not putting enough care or effort into connecting components together properly. So, what you need to do is to think, and double-think about whether or not you're connecting a component properly - each time you insert a component leg into a particular hole in the breadboard grid.

You have ignored several things I wrote about the RX TX connection of the BT device.
Seems to be connected all wrong.

Didn't even look at the gas sensor yet.
Leo..