I think someone at Pixar is a fan of Nixie displays.

Look at the detail of the tubes here. Pixar is great, but this is just above and beyond. And then a split-flap display for icing on the cake. Someone there loves the retro tech.

MonstersUDisplay.jpg

JoeN: Look at the detail of the tubes here. Pixar is great, but this is just above and beyond.

They've always paid close attention to detail - go all the way back to the Luxo Jr. film (1986):

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Luxo_Jr.

...plenty of attention to mechanical design detail there.

cr0sh:

JoeN:
Look at the detail of the tubes here. Pixar is great, but this is just above and beyond.

They’ve always paid close attention to detail - go all the way back to the Luxo Jr. film (1986):

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Luxo_Jr.

…plenty of attention to mechanical design detail there.

One of the things that I actively wait for at the beginning of any Pixar movie is when Luxo Jr. smashes down the I letter and then his head turns towards the viewer and a distinct “click” is heard. I had a desk lamp just like this when I was a kid and the thing made exactly that sound when you rotated the head through about 90 degrees (one of the springs does it). I always thought it was cool that they caught that detail.

Is it really "attention to detail" or just a side effect of digital animation? Spending weeks modeling just a few minutes of scene you probably get to know every object pretty well.

Speaking of mechanical design, can you explain the rivet placement (or explain why rivets would be used) on that scoreboard?

Chagrin:
Is it really “attention to detail” or just a side effect of digital animation? Spending weeks modeling just a few minutes of scene you probably get to know every object pretty well.

Well - that could be said for today’s animation; and even yesterday’s too. But in the case of that early movie, in 1986, they probably had to take a ton of hand measurements, photographs, etc - in other words, the method of modelling the item involved a ton of fairly manual labor. There wasn’t the same level of 3D digitizing equipment and such back then. So that probably influenced the attention placed on the real object and the model itself, to an extent.

Chagrin:
Speaking of mechanical design, can you explain the rivet placement (or explain why rivets would be used) on that scoreboard?

Well - given that its a movie, it’s just done to make the scene look better, and less flat; a form of “greebling” (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greeble).

But in real life - if you had a large object like that (think of a plane, or a train or similar) - it would be made of sheet metal, but the metal wouldn’t have the inherent strength as-is to support it’s shape, so there is an armature or skeleton underneath (generally made of more metal), to which the sheet steel needs to be attached. So - it would generally be attached with rivets or screws - rivets are generally used for such designs where the metal shouldn’t come apart from the armature (and screws where access, removal, or replacement is needed).

Today, what would be used would be glues or spot-welding, or even some kind of “unibody” construction, where the support structure is “pressed” into the metal itself in a die-molding operation (like that used for unibody automobile chassis). Perhaps even a composite sandwich structure…

I, on the other hand, just think monsters like rivets. The more, the better.