ICSP connection required for xbee shield?

the xbee shield has a 6 pin header on it for the 6 icsp pins on the arduino 2009. is the connection necessary for the xbee shield to properly work? or is it just there for stabilization purposes?

Unfortunately, the xbee shield gets its power from the ICSP connector instead of the power connector. So yes, it’s required… (It also propagates the reset signal to the on-board button, which is less important these days, except for downloading code via Xbee (did that ever work?))

If you have (say) one of the Arduino Serial Single Sided designs that doesn’t have the ICSP connector in the normal place, you can probably get an Xbee shield to work by routing power through wires connected to the appropriate places, but it won’t be pretty.

I was actually going to use the liquidware extender shield… but thanks for the heads up :wink:

The X-Bee shield really could benefit from a redesign. Why does it have this strange form factor and does not allow to stack anything else on top of it?

I was just thinking about taking ladyada’s xbee breakout design, and modifying it for a simple xbee shield for the 2009… what do you think?

What I would really love to have is a “proto shield” that includes the required spacing and circuity to directly mount an xbee module on it. Like the old x-bee shield, but instead of cutting of unused board part, leave some room to put your own circuits on it. Plus of course, make it stackable such that I can add further other shields on top (in my case: I would like to put the S65 shield from Watterott on top to have a display - not only useful for debugging, but also for my final application).

Jezuz, you’re saying that (in very babarian modes) I could remove the icsp connector from xbee shield and where I see (in xbee shield board) the labels “5V” and “GND”, next to where icsp connector, I could be soldering 2 wires and connect these in the arduino 5v and Gnd side connector?

I’m trying to use an LCD with xbee, but it seems that xbee shield stoles all power from arduino and I can badly see what the display prints.
is that so?

Thanks!!
Btp~

but it seems that xbee shield stoles all power from arduino

No. The xbee uses very little current. It is also a 3.3 V device, so be careful where you apply power to it from.

I had my own PCB’s made that have a xbee on them. One reason that the libelium shield is not stack-able is that the xbee, with it’s antenna, needs to be on top.

I thought once Xbee modules uses 3.3 v, the xbee shield would transform 5v into 3.3v in the whole circuit… that’s why lcd wouldnt display boldly.
Is that it? I’m trying plug an 16x2 lcd (not on top) with xbee shield but without displaying it properly…

The xbee uses 3.3V, and the shield does convert the 5V from the Arduino to the 3.3V that the xbee needs.

You were talking about bypassing the xbee shield connection to the Arduino, and I want ted make sure that you didn’t bypass the onboard regulator (that drops 5V to 3.3V), too.

Way to bring a thread back from the dead, guys. lol.

Jezuz, you’re saying that (in very babarian modes) I could remove the icsp connector from xbee shield and where I see (in xbee shield board) the labels “5V” and “GND”, next to where icsp connector, I could be soldering 2 wires and connect these in the arduino 5v and Gnd side connector?

Yes, you sure can.

The xbee uses very little current.

Depending on which Xbee module you’re using, it can draw up to 265mA while transmitting, and they all use about 50mA while receiving. The 50mA figure is about the same as the whole arduino board, and the 265mA is … not what I’d call low-power at all! In either case, this is too much to be provided by the 3.3V regulator present on modern arduinos, and the arduino shields all contain a regulator that takes 5V from the arduino and converts to 3.3V.

Hmmm. I’ve not had any issues, yet, running my xbee off the Arduino’s 3.3V power.

I’m looking at the schematic for the Arduino. http://arduino.cc/en/uploads/Main/arduino-duemilanove-schematic.pdf I don’t see where the 3.3V comes from. I’d like to understand that, if you can help.

I may want to re-design my PCB.

The 3.3v comes from the FTDI chip itself.

BUT, the supposed max for the 3.3v pin is 50ma. I haven’t ran more on it personally… but I’ve read that a couple people have without problems. (I don’t suggest you try it, unless you don’t mind blowing an FTDI chip.)

http://arduino.cc/en/Main/ArduinoBoardDuemilanove

About halfway down.

I think it’s time for Version 1.1 of my PCB’s, then. I have some other changes to incorporate, anyway.

I did some looking that the Xbee shield schematic. A couple of comments:

  • The Xbee modules are depressingly large. It takes up about half the shield area all by itself.
  • Since the Xbee modules are modules mounted on top of the shield board, their height is going to interfere with stacking shields even if connector placement is “normal.”
  • the official board crams things pretty tightly.

This is a very very basic question about electronics, as basic as my knowlegde.

Arduino runs at 5v. Any incoming power (usb or a 9v battery) would be converted to 5v.
FTDI chips will use 3.3v so anywhere in the board 5v falls into 3.3v.

However, Arduino still outputs 5v. Which means that 3.3v and 5v coexist peacefully in the board.

Now, when a xbee shield is attached, all the circuit falls to 3.3v… (which makes me complaining that my lcd shows very badly).
I’m not in position to risk burning my xbee module testing directly wiring 5v to my xbee shields…hmm.

is there any way to have 5v to display my lcd while using a xbee? (now its a xbee shields but I’m waiting for my xbee explorer - http://www.sparkfun.com/commerce/product_info.php?products_id=9132)

Regards!
Btp~