Identifying SMD component

Hello all
I got in my stock of components, an SMD chip that is defying my attempts to identify it
It is a 5-pin SOT-23 package marked LJ5RCO - the last character could be numerical or alphabetical.
My best guess is that it is a low dropout 5-volt regulator.
I wondered if anyone could throw any light on it?
Cheers

Give up. That's probably a date and/or manufacturing process code.

It's pretty much hopeless. Manufacterer's don't put the full part number on things that small, so trying to decipher it is looking for a needle in a haystack. There is a vast number of different types of ICs made in a SOT23-5 package, unless you have something to narrow down the type or manufacturer we won't be able to figure anything out.

5 pin could easily be a voltage regulator, a DC-DC converter chip, an opamp, there's quite a range of
possibilities...

Thanks all.
Give up? Not when I've got a tape of ten of them.
If only I could remember what I ordered them for and from who. I'm going to stick with the 5-V regulator theory. I reckon it's a 5-V regulator with enable. So with 5 pins, how many combinations is that?
I'll let you know how I get on. It was always going to be a long shot.
Cheers

So with 5 pins, how many combinations is that?

According to Murphy, it will be 11, sending the first 10 up in a puff of smoke...

Getting closer
LJ5 is a device code from ON Semiconductor
I think it's a NCV8560: LDO Regulator, High Performance, Low-Power, with Enable
The 5 is a teaser. According to the datasheet, 5 is the code for 3.3-volts, which sort of fits in with my messing about with XBees in sleep mode on battery power. I think I must have been toying with the idea of using the sensor, a reed switch or Hall device to enable the XBee when the gas or water meter magnet went round. Don't ask me why.
Next thing to try it out, but despite my shaky permutations, given 5 pins and polarities etc. it might be more than 10 attempts. But then I might be wrong
Thanks to all for the encouragement to keep delving, even at £0.35 each

Given that the part is an ON Semiconductor NCV8560, there should only be a single permutation. Otherwise, with input, output, ground, sense, and enable, there are 5! permutations which is 120.

You might not get too far with 10 parts if you are going through all 120 permutations unless the part survives some of the wrong permutations.

tigger:
Getting closer
LJ5 is a device code from ON Semiconductor
I think it's a NCV8560: LDO Regulator, High Performance, Low-Power, with Enable
The 5 is a teaser. According to the datasheet, 5 is the code for 3.3-volts, which sort of fits in with my messing about with XBees in sleep mode on battery power. I think I must have been toying with the idea of using the sensor, a reed switch or Hall device to enable the XBee when the gas or water meter magnet went round. Don't ask me why.
Next thing to try it out, but despite my shaky permutations, given 5 pins and polarities etc. it might be more than 10 attempts. But then I might be wrong
Thanks to all for the encouragement to keep delving, even at £0.35 each

If you know what part it is, there's one permutation, the one in the datasheet.

tigger:
I think it's a NCV8560: LDO Regulator, High Performance, Low-Power, with Enable

Finding out will be easy. Assume it is just that. And then wire it up to test. And at least it highlights the benefits of adding storage labels etc to some chips.

I got a bunch of these and label them with paint marker.
One shouldn't flip them over with 0602 parts in them, but else they are pretty fine.

Yes Southpark.
Keeping an inventory of components is a real challenge and this one slipped through.
Over the years you accumulate all manner of items and the problem becomes one of where and how to store them and then find them a year later.
Ideally, you would operate a goods-in system, religiously logging each item in and keeping a parts location database. Operating that in a domestic situation is not easy.
For storage, I use small manilla envelopes, plastic test tubes, TicTac boxes etc.
Buying mainly from Farnell/Element 14 and RS, Farnell are by far the best in terms of keeping old orders, exporting orders as CSV files and so on - RS are poor in that respect - old orders soon slip out of their system
The publishing of on-line data sheets etc. has made things a lot easier. I come from the generation pre-web when component books and paper data sheets ruled. Getting this far with just a PC is a miracle. These are very exciting days for anyone with an ounce of interest in electronics and technology and I have the Arduino project to thank for that.